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Stories tagged: This day in history


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago Miss Edith Cosgrove was outside her parent’s home on West Sixth Avenue when she looked up at the second floor porch and saw a …


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago Spokane’s first Red Cross organization was formally established in a meeting of 50 women at the Davenport Hotel’s Elizabethan Room.


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago An editorial writer mourned the passing of Col. E.H. Morrison, of Fairfield, an extraordinary man and “talented personality.”


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago Eddie Westrom and Roy Stovall, both 11, were playing on the banks of the Spokane River near Howard Street when suddenly, an apparition floated …


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago Spokane’s Italian community staged a festive Columbus Day celebration at St. Aloysius Parish Hall.


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago The front page headline doesn’t seem that earthshaking: “N.P. Grade Separation Work Awarded; To Begin at Once.”


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago George M. Martin pleaded guilty to robbing Spokane State Bank and locking the teller in the vault. But he blamed it all on a …


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago The Rev. Mark A. Matthews, “the black-maned lion of Seattle,” roared his prohibition message to a cheering crowd of 1,200 at North Central High …


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago Spokane Mayor W.J. Hindley finally relented and revoked his ban on newsreels showing scenes of the European war.


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago Frank Hye, of Elk City, Idaho, had suspected his wife of “wrongdoing” for some time. So he pretended to leave his home, but instead …


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago Spokane’s first “night” school opened at the Lewis and Clark High School building, and the teachers were unprepared for the “stampede” of learners.


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago Nearly all of Spokane’s churches joined wholeheartedly in observing a “day of prayer for peace,” as proclaimed by President Woodrow Wilson.


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago People were getting increasingly nervous about two proposed progressive laws in the state, the first being the eight-hour workday law.


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago Police finally tracked down and arrested George M. Martin, the prime suspect in the daring robbery of the Spokane State Bank more than a …


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago The death of Rev. C.S. Pringle, 80, brought back memories of the earliest pioneer and missionary days in the Northwest – and one of …


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago One of Spokane’s early attempts to become a filmmaking center couldn’t possibly have turned out worse.


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago Palouse-area farmers renewed their attack on the proposed eight-hour workday law. They said it would be a particular hardship to farmers during harvest time.


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago The great immigration surge of the early 20th century was illustrated by an account of the 61 people admitted to U.S. citizenship in Spokane’s …


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago James Monaghan turned 75, and the paper celebrated that fact by telling the life story of the man it called the region’s “oldest living …


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago Detective C.L. Harris was in church on Sunday when he looked out and saw a young boy jump in a car and drive away. …


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago Joe Rudersdorf, Spokane’s dogcatcher and “humane society” officer, announced a plan to prevent the abuse of horses by wagon drivers going up the South …


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago Esther Elven, 25, woke up in her room at the Garni Hotel and discovered two men beside her, one dead and one dying.


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago Spokane’s Interstate Fair was facing an existential crisis. It needed to raise $37,000 to pay its debts or face the loss of its fairgrounds …


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago The Davenport Hotel’s first big “society” event was a “whirl of fashion” and a “flow of wit,” according to The Spokesman-Review.


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago “Spokane Baby Is A World Beater,” trumpeted the somewhat startling headline.


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago The Davenport Hotel had been open for about two weeks, but it was finally time for what a headline called the “Greatest Opening for …


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago Rain continued to dampen the Interstate Fair, yet 5,000 people turned out for the premier event, the Spokane Derby.


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago Dutch Jake Goetz, Spokane’s saloon-casino-hotel magnate, was having a blast high atop his Coeur d’Alene Hotel.


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago The Interstate Fair dominated the news in Spokane. The big event was the Northwest Polo Championship Tournament, in which Spokane had the rare opportunity …


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago Spokane was entering what society columnist Betty Graeme called “a gay whirl” of a week, with three gala events. They were: