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  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 50 years ago William Bert Preecs, a 44-year-old Spokane salesman, had a secret life: He had been undercover as a “Red” (Communist) for the FBI over the …


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago A Sunday feature in The Spokesman-Review said that Spokane’s Chinese population numbered 400, “and nearly all of them live on the same block.” They …


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago A crew of bold bandits made plans to establish a “robber’s roost in Montana,” so they stole two horses from a Hillyard stable and …


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago Springdale city Marshal Charles E. Bartholomew testified in his own defense at his trial for the murder of saloonkeeper C.H. Gneist.


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago The city marshal of Springdale was on trial for murder, after he clubbed and shot a saloonkeeper during an altercation in the saloon.


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago The last will and testament of John Enos, known as Portuguese Joe, caused a stir in Spokane when its provisions were announced. The wealthy …


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago Everybody knew that football was a dangerous sport in 1912, but this was ridiculous.


  • Jim Kershner’s This day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago Spokane’s sheriff, George E. Stone, returned from a trip back East, and he said he learned exactly what Spokane needed for its future.


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago Pat Flanigan, a downtown Spokane denizen known as the Human Bagpipe, was tossed in jail after pulling his bagpipe stunt one too many times.


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago The headline on the cover of the Sunday magazine section shouted, “Spokane Secures Curtis Great Illustrated Library of Indian Life.”


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago Two unusual stories, both involving hot water, hit the front page:


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago Spokane city librarian G.W. Fuller was on his way to New York to make a presentation to the Carnegie Library Board, seeking a donation …


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago Spokane police were certain that they had finally tracked down fugitive Preston Thayer, wanted for the murder two months earlier of a Spokane chauffeur, …


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago A federal agent in Spokane found himself in a bizarre predicament. He arrested Alex Schmidt on charges of selling liquor to an Indian and …


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago The apple was king in Spokane in 1912, and never more so than during the week of the National Apple Show.


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago The football team from Washington State College (now WSU) was “thoroughly out-classed” against a surprising opponent: the Whitman College Missionaries, of Walla Walla.


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago A contingent of 75 Greeks and Bulgarians from Spokane boarded a train to volunteer for the bloody war raging in their home countries.


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 50 years ago A big new shopping center at 30th Avenue and Grand Boulevard cleared a key hurdle in a 1962 zoning vote.


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago A Spokane police officer, M.E. Austin, heard noises in his henhouse at 4 a.m.


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago This was the morning that The Spokesman-Review had to face reality:


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago The nighttime gym class for working girls proved to be a big hit in the Lewis and Clark High School gymnasium.


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago F.G. Ellis, a former streetcar conductor, jumped into the Spokane River from the Great Northern bridge span, in an attempt to commit suicide.


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago The Spokesman-Review offered a classic example of wishful thinking, editorial-style.


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago The Spokane ticket agent for the Great Northern made a rare sale from his ticket window – two around-the-world fares.


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago Consternation reigned in Spokane’s “noodle joints” after the city restaurant inspector issued an edict that “teapots be cleaned after each order instead of being …


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago Halloween was a wild night, with police fielding more than 500 calls. Most involved standard pranks including breaking down fences, carrying away gates, ringing …


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago A front page editorial cartoon was not exactly subtle in its denunciation of the “Cooper amendments” to the city charter, which would scrap the …


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago The Spokane Country Club announced plans for building summer cottages on its land on the Little Spokane River.


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago Maggie So-hap-pay, daughter of a Yakima Tribe chief, warned the Inland Northwest to get ready for one of the worst winters ever.


  • Jim Kershner’s this day in history

    From our archives, 100 years ago “A well-known Kellogg character” named Isaac Peterson, a Finnish miner, terrorized Kellogg for hours, leaving the town constable dead and Peterson near death.

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