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Stories tagged: Washington Agriculture Project


India tariffs squeeze out U.S. pulse imports

Pulses such as peas, lentils and chickpeas are a staple of the Indian diet, found in flavorful dishes such as daal and chana masala. “Traditionally, India was our largest overseas …


Next big thing in pulse research: peas that grow beneath winter snow

One of the most promising advancements in pulse research is the development of autumn-sown peas, which are planted before the year’s first snowfall and can produce drastically greater yields than …


Chickpeas, lentils and other ‘pulses’ are having a renaissance moment – and it’s a boon for Northwest farmers

Pulses are a class of legumes that include lentils, chickpeas, dry peas and dry beans. They’re popping up in grocery stores in a variety of familiar products and new inventions, …


UPDATED: Mon., June 11, 2018, 4 p.m.

Immigration puts hop growers in a pinch

The supply of workers has dwindled in recent years as more people are reluctant to go out into the fields “out of fear they’ll be forced to leave.”


UPDATED: Mon., June 11, 2018, 3:35 p.m.

Washington hops bring the flavor to booming craft beer industry

Whether your brew of choice is Budweiser or Bale Breaker, there are few places on Earth where you can sip a cold pint knowing the flavors came from a farm …


UPDATED: Mon., June 11, 2018, 3:50 p.m.

Hops science driven by flavor trends

Historically, hops were mostly used as a bittering agent in beer. But the craft beer industry has changed that, giving rise to aroma hops designed to impart notes of fruit, …


UPDATED: Wed., May 23, 2018, 10:44 a.m.

Ranchers wrangle a living history out of Eastern Washington scablands

Tucked within miles of barbed-wire fences and basalt columns southwest of Spokane reside what’s left of the American West: Ranchers who scratch out a living from hard work and prairie …


Western Washington nurseries changing along with consumer preferences

From ornamental flowers to native plants, $365 million industry provides products to a changing market.


Not your grandparents’ dairy: Washington operation shows scale of modern milk production

Case VanderMeulen’s oldest brother inherited his family’s 100-cow dairy in The Netherlands. So the younger brother came to America and built a fortress of milk that never sleeps.


Shell games: Washington a leader in oyster farming

Washington shellfish are among the state’s most lucrative and endangered crops.


Irritate an oyster, you might get a pearl

Oysters produce pearls to protect themselves.


Washington wine searches for an identity

Washington wines are becoming know for quality and affordability. But the state’s booming industry, still in its infancy, doesn’t have that


Washington’s acclaimed wine begins in carefully tended vineyards

Washington’s acclaimed wine begins with modern agriculture.


After a colorful harvest, Washington cranberries go to juice, sauce, dried fruit and Thanksgiving tables

After a colorful harvest, cranberries go to juice, sauce, dried fruit and Thanksgiving tables.


UPDATED: Sun., Oct. 8, 2017, 9:42 p.m.

International competition and regulation two familiar challenges to sweet corn industry

Like much of American agriculture, the sweet corn industry’s main challenges are centered around international competition and, what farmers and other in the agriculture industry call excessive regulation.


UPDATED: Sun., Oct. 8, 2017, 9:43 p.m.

The making of super sweet corn: An American farm story

QUINCY, Wash. – Russ Kehl tears an ear of corn from a field of thousands, shucks it and takes an enthusiastic bite. It’s part theater. He’s acting for two journalists …


UPDATED: Sun., Oct. 8, 2017, 9:43 p.m.

Washington corn a ‘hardy crop’ that fills the gaps between potatoes and wheat

Washington isn’t known for corn. But it should be.


UPDATED: Sun., Oct. 8, 2017, 9:42 p.m.

The history of corn

Corn has a storied and prominent place in human history.


If you buy your birdseed at Costco, the sunflower seeds might be from Spokane County

Sunflowers aren’t Washington’s biggest crop, but they can draw a crowd.


UPDATED: Sun., July 30, 2017, 7:30 p.m.

Growers rely on dwindling immigrant workforce to harvest onions

It takes a crew of onion pickers just a few hours to transform a field from a sea of knee-high green to a dusty brown collection of onion bulbs.


Sweet Lou keeps onion on minds of residents, visitors

Throwing out the ceremonial first pitch is a standard part of any baseball game. But Walla Walla is probably the only place in the world that throws a sweet onion.


Nothing like a sweet, sweet onion from Walla Walla

Before Walla Walla became known for wine, it was famous for something else: “Home of the onion so sweet you can eat it like an apple.”


The world of wheat: Growing grain in Washington

The wheels of Bill Myers’ black Jeep flung dust into the air at each bend of the gravel road that winds through his 3,300 acres of hilly farmland northwest of …


Human history fed by wheat

From the ancient Egyptians to farm kids riding on Palouse tractors, the history of wheat spans our history.


UPDATED: Sat., July 15, 2017, 10:36 p.m.

A day in the fields at WSU’s Dryland Research Station

On a gray morning in the middle of June, more than 100 farmers, scientists and wheat industry leaders gathered at Washington State University’s Dryland Research Station, a cluster of fields …


From apples to wheat, NAFTA has been a boon for Washington agriculture

For Washington apples the North American Free Trade Agreement has been a good deal.


UPDATED: Sun., May 21, 2017, 8:49 a.m.

Stalks rising: Trade deals almost spoiled Washington’s asparagus industry. But, slowly, farmers made a comeback.

Trade deals just about spoiled Washington’s asparagus industry. Farmers quit the crop. Canneries closed. And then, slowly, farmers leveraged technology, grit and food trends to build a second chance.


UPDATED: Sun., May 21, 2017, 7:54 a.m.

Dayton lost its asparagus business to the ‘War on Drugs’ but residents persevered

For decades, the asparagus cannery defined life in Dayton. Each summer an influx of about 1,000 migrant workers would join the town’s other 2,000 permanent residents. Hundreds more workers would …


UPDATED: Sun., May 21, 2017, 6:58 a.m.

Paul Turner: About that after-asparagus ‘disagreeble odour’ …

Eating asparagus is good for you, but it can make your pee stink. This awareness is not new. In 1781, Benjamin Franklin wrote, “a few stems of asparagus eaten, shall …


It’s sprawl - not pests - that pose the biggest threat to Skagit Valley tulip fields

The Skagit Valley’s proximity to bustling cities brings the pressures of development to the doorstep of farmers.