Monroe Street

Despite the Great Depression, Spokane was still growing and the young city was building to the north, up the corridors of Monroe, Washington, Howard and Division. With the county courthouse nearby, offices for attorneys, space for restaurants and storefronts for bail bondsmen were in demand. Over the years, the few wooden buildings have been replaced with brick. Today, North Monroe Street is known for antiques, both funky and functional. Stores are clustered between Broadway and the bridge, but they are sprinkled all the way to Garland.

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Show 1937
Image One Photo Archive The Spokesman-Review Image Two Jesse Tinsley The Spokesman-Review

The photo taken in 1937 shows Monroe Street, north of the Spokane River, with Thielman Locksmith and the O.K. Cigar Store on the left side and Acme Furniture and Miller Cleaners on the right. Despite the Great Depression, Spokane was still growing and the young city was building to the north, up the corridors of Monroe, Washington, Howard and Division. The last of Spokane’s street cars had just been retired in 1936 and people were taking buses, or driving their Model A Ford, downtown to shop and go to the theaters. With the county courthouse nearby, offices for attorneys, space for restaurants and storefronts for bail bondsmen were in demand. Over the years, the few wooden buildings have been replaced with brick. Today, North Monroe Street is known for antiques, both funky and functional. Stores are clustered between Broadway and the bridge, but they are sprinkled all the way to Garland.


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