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Autos

Cars We Remember: 11-year old describes 300 mph Hypercar

We're switching things up a little bit with my weekly car column, known nationally by two names, IE: either "Cars We Remember" or "Collector Car Corner." The two names were necessary as along the way I’ve been under a syndicate agreement/contract with the likes of GateHouse Media, Gannett, King Features Weekly Syndicate and Thomson News Service dating back to 1985.

 

Currently, I write weekly for Times Shamrock Newspapers (my employee for over 20 great years), Auto Round-Up Magazine family of publications out of West Virginia and my personal Greg Zyla Syndicate of 32 newspapers that I've been doing for over a decade. 

 

Unfortunately, as I write this, my most recent GateHouse/Gannett syndicates have ceased to exist, a sad ending for myself and a group of about 40 columnists who were dedicated to their craft. Seems too few were still reading the printed written word.

 

This background is necessary as I get to the gist of this week's column. Over the near 30 years I've been answering reader questions for my nostalgia auto columns, not to be confused with my Test Drive column currently on hiatus due to a lack of media pool cars, it's been the countless questions I've received from readers from across the nation that keep my columns going.  

 

Thankfully, I'm sitting on a bunch of letters that have yet to be answered. However, something occurred about six weeks ago that never happened before. Specifically, I received a letter from an 11-year old Towanda, Pa., car enthusiast by the name of Lincoln Shanks that renewed my faith in those who read the written word. It is important to know that there are still some young people out there who like to read and aren’t completely addicted to their phone and/or video game systems.

 

Prior to Lincoln's letter, the youngest to ever write me was a 15-year old from Pennsylvania who wanted to be a drag racer. That column appeared in 2016 and until now, the person who wrote it, signed only as "Tom D.," held the record as my youngest ever to write me.

 

Well, until Lincoln Shanks.

 

Lincoln is a home schooled 6th grader whose parents are Michael and Lisa Shanks. Lincoln loves supercars, swimming, technology and hanging with friends. He also plays the piano.  

 

So, here’s my initial email communication with Lincoln, and then you’ll see that I asked Lincoln to do a little article on his dream car, all explained below. I hope you enjoy this deviation from my usual work, because Lincoln deserves some press and praise.   

 

“Q: Dear Greg I just started reading your articles about cars and thought “why haven't I seen this before?” This is so cool! My name is Lincoln Shanks and I am an 11-year-old who is fascinated with "hypercars," which are high-performance supercars. I would like to suggest a brand and type of hypercar to put in the newspaper.

 

How about the Bugatti Chiron?

 

It's a record breaking car at 304.77 MPH with 1,600 horsepower! If possible, maybe you could put the history of the car and brand in the newspaper too. If you would like to use the car in the newspaper but need more information about it just let me know. I am looking forward to hearing from you.

Signed, Lincoln Shanks, Towanda, Pa.”

 

So, I quickly replied to Lincoln and asked him to write a short car review of the Bugatti. Here’s Lincoln’s reply.

 

“Thank you for getting back to me! I am thrilled to hear you are going to include the info I write about the Bugatti Chiron. In real life I had a chance to sit in the Bugatti Veyron. It was one of the best days of my life. I am still working on what I am going to include in the article,” said Lincoln.

 

I wrote back and told Lincoln all I needed was a photo of him to include in his article and I would give him a by-line on the Bugatti. Here is Lincoln’s very first car article. (Like I said, I don't get many letters from 11-year-old car lovers.) Thanks very much Lincoln for your interesting article on the fastest production Hypercar in the world. And, you’re one-upping this old-timer as I’ve never got the chance to even sit in a Bugatti, let alone drive one. I’ve seen them in person at Watkins Glen over the years, but that’s as far as I got.

 

Good luck to you Lincoln, and follow your dreams wherever they may lead you.  

 

I did.

 

<i>Car Review:

 

The Bugatti Chiron Super Sport 300+

 

By Lincoln Shanks

The Bugatti Chiron Super Sport 300+ is a limited edition car that has achieved 304.77-mph and is now rated the fastest car in the world.

The Chiron is powered by an 8.0-liter quad-turbocharged W16 engine. It has a power output of 1,600 horsepower at 6,700 rpm with a 7-speed dual clutch automatic transmission. The fuel system is direct injection, allowing the engine to get the most power as possible.

The engine is located in the back of the car with a size of 487.8 cubic inches. The Bugatti features 4-turbochargers with Bugatti inter-cooling, and the car has a maximum torque of 1600 Newton Meters.   

Its drivetrain is an all-wheel drive, allowing it to take off fast and stick to the road. It is a 2-door vehicle and can hold up to two passengers. The car’s production number is limited to 30 units total.

I like the Bugatti brand because it is dedicated to being the fastest, and like the Bugatti motto says, they are “The Best of the Best.” The company takes time to design its cars and make each one a masterpiece.

Important numbers are a wheelbase of 106.7-inches, 22-gallon fuel tank, 4,361 lb. curb weight, and a 3.54-inch ground clearance.  

What I like most about the Chiron is its amazing overall performance. The Chiron’s speed and design capture my attention and excite me! It may be hard to spot a Bugatti on the road, but it is worth going to a dealership to check out this sports car model. I hope that I can drive a Chiron one day! </i>



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