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Eye On Boise

Bills that didn’t: You heard about these proposals, but they didn’t pass

With the dust still settling from this year’s legislative session, here are some bills that made news, but didn’t become law, which may be a surprise to some:

SB 1102, requiring a physician who performs a surgical abortion to have admitting privileges at a hospital within 30 miles of the procedure, died in committee in the Senate.

HB 95, exempting materials used in public roads from the sales tax at a cost to the state general fund of $20 million a year, died for lack of House concurrence in Senate amendments.

HB 18, banning urban renewal agencies from using eminent domain, died in committee in the House.

HB 32, the Idaho Fish & Game Departments’ “fee lock” bill, which would raise resident hunting and fishing license fees, but grandfather in current rates for anyone who loyally purchases one every year, died in committee in the House. Resident license fees haven’t increased since 2005.

HB 67, attempting to set limits on Idaho delegates to a U.S. constitutional convention, narrowly passed the House but died in a Senate committee.

HB 71, creating a specialty license plate to benefit the Orofino Maniacs, died in committee in the House.

HB 149, to ban “price floors” set by manufacturers or distributors of contact lenses, passed the House but died in a Senate committee.

HB 162, to raise pay for people who serve on juries for more than five days, passed the House but died in a Senate committee.

HB 307, to establish a voluntary, three-year Kindergarten Preparedness Program pilot project funded through a public-private partnership, died in committee in the House.

HB 317, to require all state constitutional officers to report to the Legislature on contracts they sign for more than $500,000, died in committee in the House.

SB 1022 and SB 1083, to create an “America the Beautiful” specialty license plate, died in committee in the Senate.

SB 1070, to allow parents to opt their students out of high-stakes tests required for high school graduation, passed the Senate but died in a House committee.

 SB 1095a, to set up a new risk-based, five-tiered sex offender registry, passed the Senate but died in a House committee.



Betsy Z. Russell
Betsy Z. Russell joined The Spokesman-Review in 1991. She currently is a reporter in the Boise Bureau covering Idaho state government and politics, and other news from Idaho's state capital.

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