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Huckleberries Online

Pearl Harbor witness: ‘It was so scary’

Nancy Harlocker, of Dalton Gardens, describes the day she watched the bombing of Pearl Harbor from her rooftop. Her father, a dentist, left the family for a few weeks because all medical personnel were needed to tend to the injured. She later became a newswoman with the Honolulu Advertiser. She was photographed at her home Nov. 24, 2015. (Kathy Plonka / The Spokesman-Review)
Nancy Harlocker, of Dalton Gardens, describes the day she watched the bombing of Pearl Harbor from her rooftop. Her father, a dentist, left the family for a few weeks because all medical personnel were needed to tend to the injured. She later became a newswoman with the Honolulu Advertiser. She was photographed at her home Nov. 24, 2015. (Kathy Plonka / The Spokesman-Review)

Like most Americans, Nancy Harlocker’s world changed on Dec. 7, 1941. A 10-year-old living an idyllic island childhood on Oahu, Harlocker woke to the sound of her father yelling, “We’re at war!” She and her 14-year-old brother looked up to see a Japanese Zero flying overhead. “The thing I remember most from that morning is seeing the red rising sun on that plane,” Harlocker, 84, recalled recently. “It was so scary.” The Dalton Gardens resident was born in Hawaii, where her father had a thriving dental practice. On that morning in 1941, she and her brother went up onto the roof to watch the planes/Cindy Hval, SR. More here.

Question: Are there any World War II veterans still alive in your family?



D.F. Oliveria
D.F. (Dave) Oliveria joined The Spokesman-Review in 1984. He currently is a columnist and compiles the Huckleberries Online blog and writes about North Idaho in his Huckleberries column.

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