Arrow-right Camera
The Spokesman-Review Newspaper

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
Partly Cloudy Day 39° Partly Cloudy

Huckleberries Online

Crowd celebrates Hanukkah

Before lighting a large menorah, Rabbi Yisroel Hahn speaks to the crowd gathered in Riverfront Park on Sunday. The Chabad of Spokane County community center presented the event in celebration of the eight-day Jewish Hanukkah holiday that began on the evening of Dec. 6. (Colin Mulvany / The Spokesman-Review)
Before lighting a large menorah, Rabbi Yisroel Hahn speaks to the crowd gathered in Riverfront Park on Sunday. The Chabad of Spokane County community center presented the event in celebration of the eight-day Jewish Hanukkah holiday that began on the evening of Dec. 6. (Colin Mulvany / The Spokesman-Review)

Before lighting a large menorah on the final evening of Hanukkah, Rabbi Yisroel Hahn, of Spokane, reflected Sunday on the strong mid-November windstorm that left much of the city in darkness and cold. “This great wind … took down our beautiful pine trees and turned them into tools of destruction and caused us to lose our power and our warmth, our heat,” Hahn told about 150 people huddled near the Rotary Fountain in Riverfront Park. The Chabad of Spokane County that serves the Jewish community with religious, educational and social services was without power in the week after the storm. If the crisis symbolized the pervasive darkness in today’s world, the eight-day festival of lights that is Hanukkah represents the power of good deeds, said Hahn, who leads the community center. He asked, “What can we do when we see senseless evil around the world?/Scott Maben, SR. More here.

Question: Do you know much about Hanukkah?



D.F. Oliveria
D.F. (Dave) Oliveria joined The Spokesman-Review in 1984. He currently is a columnist and compiles the Huckleberries Online blog and writes about North Idaho in his Huckleberries column.

Follow Dave online: