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Huckleberries Online

Civil rights icon visits Lake City

Legendary human rights activist James Meredith visits the Human Rights Educational Institute in Coeur d’Alene on Friday, Oct. 16, 2015. It was Meredith’s attempt at enrolling at the University of Mississippi in 1962 that set off the riots that resulted in two dead, hundreds wounded and many arrested -- as well as 31K national guardsmen sent in to enforce order. He spoke at North Idaho Community College Friday, followed by visits to University of Idaho and Lewis-Clark State College. (Kathy Plonka/SR photo)
Legendary human rights activist James Meredith visits the Human Rights Educational Institute in Coeur d’Alene on Friday, Oct. 16, 2015. It was Meredith’s attempt at enrolling at the University of Mississippi in 1962 that set off the riots that resulted in two dead, hundreds wounded and many arrested -- as well as 31K national guardsmen sent in to enforce order. He spoke at North Idaho Community College Friday, followed by visits to University of Idaho and Lewis-Clark State College. (Kathy Plonka/SR photo)

The observing and determined look on James Meredith’s face is the same today as in that famous photo taken of him in 1962, when he was the first African-American to seek enrollment at the University of Mississippi. Sitting in a comfortable armchair at the Human Rights Education Institute in Coeur d’Alene Friday afternoon, Meredith was exquisitely dressed in a cream suit nearly the same color as the straw hat he wore. He spoke about race relations and his experiences prior to addressing a forum at North Idaho College. Meredith came to North Idaho to share his life story of fighting for civil rights while facing intense bigotry and oppression in the segregated South of the ’50s and ’60s. “Fifty years ago I used Ole Miss to teach the world a lesson,” Meredith said. “Now I plan on using Mississippi to teach Idaho a lesson”/Pia Hallenberg, SR. More here.

Question: Do you know much about the civil rights struggle of the 1950s and 1960s?



D.F. Oliveria
D.F. (Dave) Oliveria joined The Spokesman-Review in 1984. He currently is a columnist and compiles the Huckleberries Online blog and writes about North Idaho in his Huckleberries column.

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