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Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Huckleberries Online

Beets have use other than for borscht

Raw or roasted, jewel-toned beets lend an earthy flavor to autumn salads and sides. (Adriana Janovich/SR photo)
Raw or roasted, jewel-toned beets lend an earthy flavor to autumn salads and sides. (Adriana Janovich/SR photo)

Crimson-colored beets are good for much more than – but often only associated with – that good old Slavic staple: borscht. Yet, there are so many ways to enjoy the herbaceous and somewhat grassy groundling that always seems to taste of the earth from which it was dug. The humble root vegetable with the deep, royal hue can be intimidating; its purplish-red juice stains clothing and counter tops, so exercise caution. Or, opt for golden, white or red-and-white beets. The taproot is low in calories and rich in folate and vitamins A, C and K as well as dietary fiber. The flavor is reminiscent of spinach and carrot combined, but a little bit sweeter and much less bitter/Adriana Janovich, SR. More here.

Question: I've never eaten borscht. Have you?



D.F. Oliveria
D.F. (Dave) Oliveria joined The Spokesman-Review in 1984. He currently is a columnist and compiles the Huckleberries Online blog and writes about North Idaho in his Huckleberries column.

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