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Huckleberries Online

Redux: When public servants were civil

In this 1995 SR file photo, North Idaho representative Jim Stoicheff, in front of the capitol building, gets a homemade plaque from childhood friend DeVon Smith to commemmorate 60 years of friendship. Smith made the plaque from recycled scrap metal. (File photo by Joe Relk)
In this 1995 SR file photo, North Idaho representative Jim Stoicheff, in front of the capitol building, gets a homemade plaque from childhood friend DeVon Smith to commemmorate 60 years of friendship. Smith made the plaque from recycled scrap metal. (File photo by Joe Relk)

Here's the Dec. 22, 1999, editorial that I wrote for The Spokesman-Review in wake of the unexpected death of legislative giant Jim Stoicheff, R-Sandpoint:

The 2000 Legislature is going to be a little less colorful. A little less thoughtful. A little less compassionate. A little more partisan.  State Rep. Jim Stoicheff, D-Sandpoint, won't be there to hold tempers and bad legislation in check. His unexpected death to a heart attack Saturday leaves a void. Even in recent years when the number of House Democrats dwindled to a baker's dozen, Stoicheff took the edge off bitter partisan debates. His good humor, thoughtful comments and practical approach to politics were welcomed on both sides of the aisle. ``He was one of the real personalities of the Legislature,'' said Gov. Dirk Kempthorne. ``He was colorful and tenacious in his approach, and I always saw a twinkle in his eye.'' Full editorial here.

Question: Do you remember "Stoich"?



D.F. Oliveria
D.F. (Dave) Oliveria joined The Spokesman-Review in 1984. He currently is a columnist and compiles the Huckleberries Online blog and writes about North Idaho in his Huckleberries column.

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