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Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Eye On Olympia

Basic education bill: the details…

In a bill closely watched by schools advocates, the state Senate plans to vote on -- and presumably pass -- an amended version of HB 2261 this afternoon.

"We're working with the governor and members of the House to agree on a bill to responsibly reform and retool our educational system," Senate education committee chairwoman Rosemary McAuliffe said in a statement about the proposal. "It's critical that these reforms are meaningful and phased in over time to actually achieve and maintain progress. But we cannot disregard our current economic climate, particularly as we make drastic cuts to our schools, colleges and universities and eliminate health care coverage for tens of thousands of people."

I wrote about some of the political tension around this bill in this morning's paper. The short version: the state PTA and others are pushing to redefine basic education (which the state must pay for), while the state teacher's union says the real battle should be trying to stave off a billion in cuts right now.

Here are some highlights from the Senate version of the plan:

-Redefines basic education: increases instructional hours from 1000 to 1080 a year, phased in over years. "Opportunity to complete 24 credits" for high school graduation. New transportation funding formula phased in, beginning in 2013.

-More: definition will include all-day kindergarten, phased in at highest-poverty schools first. Also, money for gifted students. It also starts down the path toward expanding early learning for at-risk kids.

-Prototype school: The amended bill will create a standard "core allocation" to base school funding on, including enhancements for gifted students, advanced placement and spelling out staffing levels in law. It would take effect in 2011.

-Timeline: The new definition of basic ed would be fully in efffect by 2018.

-Accountability: the state board of education would have to set up "a system to identify schools for recognition and additional support."

-Teacher certification: the state Professional Educator Standards Board would have to "adopt performance standards for effective teaching and recommend other modifications for educator certification."

And here's the key part, especially in the eyes of the Washington Education Association:

-"Revenue: Not addressed."

 



Short takes and breaking news from the Washington Legislature and the state capital.