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Thursday, November 21, 2019  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Outdoors blog

Would you dare prey on something with ‘eyes’ like this?

A Polyphemus Moth discovered in the large pines along the Kettle River. This is a North American member of the giant silk moths. The most notable feature of the moth is its large, purplish eyespots on its two hindwings. The eye spots are where it gets its name – from the Greek myth of the Cyclops Polyphemus (Jon Foster Fanning)
A Polyphemus Moth discovered in the large pines along the Kettle River. This is a North American member of the giant silk moths. The most notable feature of the moth is its large, purplish eyespots on its two hindwings. The eye spots are where it gets its name – from the Greek myth of the Cyclops Polyphemus (Jon Foster Fanning)

WILDLIFE WATCHING -- Northeast Washington forest firefighter Jon Foster Fanning captured this wildlife moment this week:

"A Polyphemus moth I discovered in the large pines along the Kettle River. This is a North American member of the giant silk moths.

"The most notable feature of the moth is its large, purplish eyespots on its two hindwings. The eye spots are where it gets its name – from the Greek myth of the Cyclops Polyphemus."



Rich Landers
Rich Landers joined The Spokesman-Review in 1977. He is the Outdoors editor for the Sports Department writing and photographing stories about hiking, hunting, fishing, boating, conservation, nature and wildlife and related topics.

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