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Tuesday, August 20, 2019  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Outdoors blog

Natural, cultural history displayed at Dry Falls

Adam Deutsch, left, and Max Bergam look out over Dry Falls, which gushed with water between 12,000 and 18,000 years ago when catastrophic floods poured through the Pacific Northwest. Dry Falls is located in Sun Lakes-Dry Falls State Park, 25 miles south of Coulee Dam on state Highway 17, just off U.S. Highway 2.rebeccan@spokesman.com (Rebecca Nappi / The Spokesman-Review)
Adam Deutsch, left, and Max Bergam look out over Dry Falls, which gushed with water between 12,000 and 18,000 years ago when catastrophic floods poured through the Pacific Northwest. Dry Falls is located in Sun Lakes-Dry Falls State Park, 25 miles south of Coulee Dam on state Highway 17, just off U.S. Highway 2.rebeccan@spokesman.com (Rebecca Nappi / The Spokesman-Review)

 NATURAL HISTORY -- Natural and cultural history of the Dry Falls area will be presented in displays by the Wanapum Heritage Center and the Ice Age Floods Institute on Saturday (Sept. 8), 10 a.m.-4 p.m., at the Dry Falls State Park Visitor Center south of Coulee City, Wash.

Visitors can explore the Wanapum Native American Discovery Unit and talk with tribal educators about the rich history of the Wanapum tribe.

Learn about the historic floods that shaped North America through an interpretive display by the Ice Age Floods Institute.

Admission is free. The Discover Pass is required for vehicle access to the event.

See map here.

Read on for more details.

WHERE: Dry Falls Visitor Center parking lot in Sun Lakes-Dry Falls State Park, 34875 Park Lake Road N.E. in Coulee City.

PARK HISTORY: Dry Falls Visitor Center is located two miles north of the Sun Lake-Dry Falls State Park entrance on Highway 17. The center is open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. March 1 to Oct. 31. Admission is free, with donations accepted.
 
Sun Lakes-Dry Falls State Park is a 4,027-acre camping park with 73,640 feet of freshwater shoreline at the foot of Dry Falls, a geological wonder of North America. Carved by Ice Age floods, the former waterfall is now a stark cliff, 400 feet high and 3.5 miles wide. In its heyday, the waterfall was four times the size of Niagara Falls. Today, it overlooks a desert oasis filled with lakes and abundant wildlife.
  
For more information about the event, contact Julie Anderson at Dry Falls Visitor Center at (509) 632-5214 and Dry.Falls@parks.wa.gov.



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Rich Landers
Rich Landers joined The Spokesman-Review in 1977. He is the Outdoors editor for the Sports Department writing and photographing stories about hiking, hunting, fishing, boating, conservation, nature and wildlife and related topics.

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