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Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883

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UI writers signing up for Semester in the Wild

Students in the University of Idaho’s first Semester in the Wild program take a class in the Frank Church-River of No Return Wilderness in Idaho. (Associated Press)
Students in the University of Idaho’s first Semester in the Wild program take a class in the Frank Church-River of No Return Wilderness in Idaho. (Associated Press)

WILDERNESS -- Enrollment is open for University of Idaho students up for spending a semester living and learning in Idaho’s beautiful and rugged mountains through the College of Natural Resource’s Semester in the Wild.

What better way for a college writer to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Wilderness Act?

Here are the details from UI:

Semester in the Wild combines upper-division science learning, leadership, environmental literature and writing while living in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness. Students learn the ecological and social relationships in nature through hands-on investigation and writing, while building leadership skills and personal understanding. This limited-enrollment experience unites students from across the country to live, learn and grow together in America’s Wildest Classroom. 

Preferential enrollment is open through April 11. To enroll, go to uidaho.edu/wild.

Semester in the Wild is in its second year, having touched the lives of 11 undergraduates in 2013. The program is possible because of the college’s ownership of the Taylor Wilderness Research Station, which is used for year-round research and education.

“This experience was amazing, it changed my perspective on life and I loved it,” said Susie Everly, a UI student in the inaugural class.

The students live at Taylor with the station managers. Faculty from the college and from the UI English Department fly in on a rotation to teach classes in blocks.

“We knew this was a perfect setting to teach things like river ecology and wilderness management, but it is equally ideal for classes like environmental writing and western literature,” said Tom Gorman, professor and associate dean of the College of Natural Resources. 



Rich Landers
Rich Landers joined The Spokesman-Review in 1977. He is the Outdoors editor for the Sports Department writing and photographing stories about hiking, hunting, fishing, boating, conservation, nature and wildlife and related topics.

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