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Sunday, November 17, 2019  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Ketchum wants Idaho to use nonlethal wolf control

A great Pyrenees guard dog keeps a watchful eye over a large band of ewes at Lava Lake Land & Livestock, grazing near the North Fork of the Big Lost River northeast of Ketchum, Idaho, to help keep the sheep from falling prey to wolves. (Jason Kauffman / Associated Press)
A great Pyrenees guard dog keeps a watchful eye over a large band of ewes at Lava Lake Land & Livestock, grazing near the North Fork of the Big Lost River northeast of Ketchum, Idaho, to help keep the sheep from falling prey to wolves. (Jason Kauffman / Associated Press)

PREDATORS  — City leaders in the central Idaho resort town of Ketchum have passed a resolution requesting state officials use nonlethal methods to manage wolf conflicts with livestock in Blaine County.

The city council in the resolution passed Monday said guard dogs, strobe lights and electric fencing are preferable to aerial gunning, hunting and trapping, according to the Associated Press.

Councilors in the resolution say tourism and wildlife are important to local citizens and the economy.

Councilors are also asking state leaders to reconsider what is considered a viable wolf population.

Idaho lawmakers earlier this year approved creating a $400,000 fund and a five-member board to authorize the killing of wolves.

Conservation groups say that will drive down the Idaho wolf population to about 150 animals. There are about 650 wolves in the state now.



Rich Landers
Rich Landers joined The Spokesman-Review in 1977. He is the Outdoors editor for the Sports Department writing and photographing stories about hiking, hunting, fishing, boating, conservation, nature and wildlife and related topics.

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