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Monday, January 27, 2020  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Outdoors blog

Landers offers shocking solution to off-leash dog threats

Dogs walk off leash along with their human companions at Fort Funston in San Francisco, Thursday, Sept. 29, 2011.  There are more dogs in this City by the Bay than there are kids. So it stands to reason dog owners carry a lot of clout _ so much so they think their endorsement can sway the upcoming mayoral race. They have formed a Political Action Committee to promote the interests of their four-footed friends, namely space to run free, even the country's largest urban national park. (Marcio Sanchez / Associated Press)
Dogs walk off leash along with their human companions at Fort Funston in San Francisco, Thursday, Sept. 29, 2011. There are more dogs in this City by the Bay than there are kids. So it stands to reason dog owners carry a lot of clout _ so much so they think their endorsement can sway the upcoming mayoral race. They have formed a Political Action Committee to promote the interests of their four-footed friends, namely space to run free, even the country's largest urban national park. (Marcio Sanchez / Associated Press)

PUBLIC LANDS -- I've been told by a reader/dog owner that by writing about my uncomfortable experience with loose dogs at Mount Spokane, in Sunday Outdoors, I'm paving a way for a ban on all dogs in the state park.

I disagree and suggest that people who disobey the park leash law could be leading the way to a dog ban.  All it would take is one dog attack on a human or leashed pet to prompt a lawsuit that could cause a knee-jerk reaction that would lead to a ban on pets in parks.

I understand that people want to let their dogs loose. The issue is where they choose to do it.

I'm wondering if I could make a bundle of money by developing a cattle prod hiking stick.  That way, if a loose dog persisted in threatening me or my on-leash dog, I could give it a quick shock to deter the immediate problem.

At the same time, I'd be delivering a lesson and an important training moment that might deter the dog from bothering the next person.

Win-Win.  

What do you think?



Rich Landers
Rich Landers joined The Spokesman-Review in 1977. He is the Outdoors editor for the Sports Department writing and photographing stories about hiking, hunting, fishing, boating, conservation, nature and wildlife and related topics.

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