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Sunday, July 5, 2020  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Killing problem wolves can save livestock, UW study says

Cowboys examine a calf they say was severely injured by wolves, latest in a series of wolf attacks on Diamond M Ranch cattle since mid July.  (Stevens County Cattlemen's Association)
Cowboys examine a calf they say was severely injured by wolves, latest in a series of wolf attacks on Diamond M Ranch cattle since mid July. (Stevens County Cattlemen's Association)

PREDATORS -- Pro-wolf groups touted a 2014 Washington State University researcher's study that indicated killing wolves involved in attacking livestock would simply exacerbate the problem long term.

In recently published dueling science, University of Washington researchers have surveyed research and found the opposite may be true.

Three UW researchers, who aren’t wildlife biologists but were intrigued by the earlier study, analyzed the same data with a different statistical approach.

Their work indicated that killing wolves that prey on livestock can lead to a short-term increase in attacks, particularly for sheep. But the year after the wolves were killed, livestock attacks went down.

See the story by S-R reporter Becky Kramer.



Rich Landers
Rich Landers joined The Spokesman-Review in 1977. He is the Outdoors editor for the Sports Department writing and photographing stories about hiking, hunting, fishing, boating, conservation, nature and wildlife and related topics.

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