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Sunday, October 20, 2019  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Outdoors blog

Inslee signs bill protecting personal information in cases related to wolf attacks

This gray wolf image was captured in 2007 by a remote sensor camera set up by state biologists in the LeClerc Creek drainage of Pend Oreille County two days after a cow elk triggered the camera shutter in the same spot. The photo helped document that wolves were moving into Washington. A breeding pack was documented in 2009. Photo courtesy of Washington Fish and Wildlife Department.
 (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife)
This gray wolf image was captured in 2007 by a remote sensor camera set up by state biologists in the LeClerc Creek drainage of Pend Oreille County two days after a cow elk triggered the camera shutter in the same spot. The photo helped document that wolves were moving into Washington. A breeding pack was documented in 2009. Photo courtesy of Washington Fish and Wildlife Department. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife)

ENDANGERED SPECIES -- A new state law will exempt from public disclosure personal information about people who report or respond to wolf attacks in Washington, the Associated Press reports. Gov. Jay Inslee signed House Bill 1465 into law today.

Here's more from the AP:

The legislation prevents the release of information of people who report wolf attacks as well as those who participate in state programs aimed at preventing wolf attacks. It will also exempt the names of state contractors or others involved in killing wolves from public records.

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife and other supporters have cited death threats received by employees, ranchers and others. They say the measure is needed to protect those who deal with wolves.

Meanwhile, some argue that private information should be protected but that the public has the right to know how state policies and programs are carried out.

The exemption expires after five years unless a committee finds a continuing need for it.




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Rich Landers
Rich Landers joined The Spokesman-Review in 1977. He is the Outdoors editor for the Sports Department writing and photographing stories about hiking, hunting, fishing, boating, conservation, nature and wildlife and related topics.

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