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Spin Control

I-1100 turns in petitions to change liquor rules

Glenn Avery of Modernize Washington wheels boxes of petitions for I-1100 into the Secretary of State's office on June 23, 2010
Glenn Avery of Modernize Washington wheels boxes of petitions for I-1100 into the Secretary of State's office on June 23, 2010

Glenn Avery of Modernize Washington wheels boxes of signed petitions into the Secretary of State's office. Staff photo by Jim Camden

OLYMPIA -- Supporters of Initiative 1100 turned in what they estimate are 390,000 signatures on their petitions for a ballot measure to privatize liquor sales. It's a number that all but guarantees them a spot on the Nov. 2 ballot.

"I think it would be amazing if we didn't" make the ballot, said Glenn Avery, treasurer of the Modernize Washington campaign after wheeling in a hand cart stacked with boxes of signed petitions. 

Staff from the Secretary of State's office began sorting the petitions for an official count of signatures.

About 40 percent of the signatures were gathered at Costco, Avery said. The rest were collected in stores and by paid signature gatherers.

Costco has provided $842,000, the vast majority of cash and in-kind contributions for the initiative, which has more support from retailers. Another initiative which would also privatize liquor sales, I-1105, has support from distributors and has a total of $864,000 from two distribution and wholesaling companies.

The manager of the I-1105 campaign said Tuesday it will also turn in signatures before the July 2 deadline, raising the prospect of two different ballot measures with key differences before voters this fall. Avery said that will likely result in some confusion for voters, but he expects to draw clear distinctions between the two during the campaign if both make the ballot.

 



Jim Camden
Jim Camden joined The Spokesman-Review in 1981 and retired in 2021. He is currently the political and state government correspondent covering Washington state.

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