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Obama has Kansas at end of bracket

This is a photo of President Barack Obama's bracket for the NCAA Men's Basketball Tournament. Obama picked Kansas to win the tournament, and Gonzaga to lose to Seton Hall in the first round. (White House)
This is a photo of President Barack Obama's bracket for the NCAA Men's Basketball Tournament. Obama picked Kansas to win the tournament, and Gonzaga to lose to Seton Hall in the first round. (White House)

Following long-standing tradition in the Obama White House, the president filled out his NCAA basketball tournament bracket, and explained some of  his picks on ESPN.

This no doubt set him up for the other long-standing tradition of critics grousing about how the president should be doing more important things with his time. 

Anyway the Barack-etology has University of Kansas winning the tournament. Hey, he already went out on the limb this week by sending the Senate a Supreme Court nominee, so maybe he wanted to go the easy route on something.

On a local note, he doesn't expect Gonzaga to get past Seton Hall on Thursday night. 

Obama doesn't have the best track record with his bracket. The White House even printed a letter he got from an 11-year-old girl from Charlotte, N.C., who said she did better than he did last year. "You're a great president, just not the best bracket-picker," the young lady wrote. The White House also released the letter Obama wrote back, saying nothing was beyond her reach if she set her sights high and gave it her best effort. 

One wonders if the White House would have printed a letter in which someone said "you are a bad president and are even worse at filling out your bracket." 

Probably not. 

In any case, as the tournament continues, compare your picks with the president's, and react accordingly.



Jim Camden
Jim Camden joined The Spokesman-Review in 1981 and retired in 2021. He is currently the political and state government correspondent covering Washington state.

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