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The Tech Deck

Nintendo teams up with mobile gaming company DeNA

Don't expect to see Nintendo classics - or alterations of Nintendo classics - on your mobile device any time soon, despite the announced partnership between the video gaming juggernaut and mobile developer DeNA on Tuesday.
Don't expect to see Nintendo classics - or alterations of Nintendo classics - on your mobile device any time soon, despite the announced partnership between the video gaming juggernaut and mobile developer DeNA on Tuesday.

Nintendo's beloved stable of characters, such as Mario and Link, will soon be coming to your iPhone and Android device. 

But it's unlikely you'll be stomping Goombas in World 1-1 on your mobile phone any time soon.

Nintendo announced a partnership with fellow Japanese company DeNA in a news release Tuesday. DeNA launched in Tokyo in 1999 and has forged partnerships to develop and promote mobile games and e-commerce websites with several companies, the largest being Disney in 2012. DeNA has since brought mobile games based on Marvel superheroes and the Star Wars universe, both properties owned by Nintendo, to the mobile gaming marketplace.

The agreement, outlined in detail in the news release, does not include "porting games created specifically for the Wii U home console or the Nintendo 3DS portable system." So we won't see Donkey Kong Country: Tropical Freeze or any of the recent Super Mario releases on mobile platforms. The news release also said the focus of the partnership will be on " new original games optimized for smart device functionality," which seems to suggest classic games are also not likely to be ported.

If DeNA's previous work is any indication, it's likely we'll see a Kirby's Dreamland-inspired tower defense game or The Legend of Zelda card battle.

But that's just one cynical gamer's impression of the deal. Are you excited to see Mario jump off the screens of first-party hardware and onto the phone in your pocket? What classic Nintendo games would make great mobile experiences? Tell us in the comments below.



Kip Hill
Kip Hill joined The Spokesman-Review in 2013. He currently is a reporter for the City Desk, covering the marijuana industry, local politics and breaking news. He previously hosted the newspaper's podcast.

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