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Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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U.S. Senator

Related Coverage, Page 2

Voters vent frustrations with GOP gains in county, state

Democrat Chris Marr conceded defeat Wednesday night in the record-breaking million-dollar battle for a Spokane County state Senate seat. Marr made up some ground in the second day of ballot counting against Republican Michael Baumgartner, but he said it was too little to make a difference.

Murray expands lead over Rossi

OLYMPIA, Wash. (AP) — Democratic incumbent Patty Murray has expanded her lead over Republican challenger Dino Rossi in the latest Washington state Senate vote totals.

How close for recount?

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Voters favor Republicans locally and nationally

Washington Republicans were lifted by a national tide in Tuesday’s elections, one that cost Democrats at least one of the state’s congressional seats and left a key U.S. Senate seat in doubt. Early returns indicate the tide will carry more Republicans into the still solidly Democratic-controlled Legislature in Olympia, and to the already Republican-dominated courthouse in Spokane. Because Washington votes will continue to arrive in the mail for more than a week, close races might not be decided until right before Thanksgiving.

Candidates make one last push

Candidates up and down the ticket scrambled for votes on Election Day.

Candidates race to finish line

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Murray, Rossi hit road in final push for votes

Democratic incumbent Patty Murray and Republican challenger Dino Rossi wrapped up their road trips today as volunteers on both sides lit up phone lines and knocked on doors — even in chilling fall weather — to drum up every vote they could muster.

Murray, Rossi in Spokane Saturday

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Poll roundup in the Senate race

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Inboxes become political arenas

The fight for Washington’s U.S. Senate seat is not just waged at rallies, in debates and on the airwaves. It’s a daily e-mail battle from the two sides trying to get attention from local and national press on their key talking points of the day.

Parties’ big guns stump for Senate foes Murray, Rossi

First Lady Michelle Obama tried to help get Patty Murray re-elected by telling a luncheon crowd to get “fired up.” U.S. Sen. John McCain tried to boost Republican Dino Rossi’s chances of joining him in the Senate by saying Murray “engages in a corrupt practice.” With eight days left in the election, Washington’s Senate race was dominated by surrogates Monday.

Michelle Obama, McCain enter Wash. Senate race fray

First Lady Michelle Obama tried to help get Patty Murray re-elected by telling a luncheon crowd to get “fired up.” U.S. Sen. John McCain tried to boost to Republican Dino Rossi’s chances of joining him in the Senate by saying Murray “engages in a corrupt practice.”

Michelle Obama: Get fired up

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McCain: Murray part of ‘corrupt process’

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Spin Control: Mr. President, welcome to Spokane

After President Barack Obama stopped in a Seattle neighborhood for a “backyard conversation,” the Washington State Republican Party complained that this was nothing but a political event for which Sen. Patty Murray’s re-election campaign should be charged. Maybe it was, maybe it wasn’t. The 35 or so folks gathered in the Wedgwood backyard were polite – “Seattle nice” was the phrase some local reporters used – and while several said their questions weren’t pre-approved by White House staff, many prefaced their remarks with praise for what he’s done or thanks for coming to town.

Obama joined by Murray during Seattle backyard meeting

SEATTLE – Voters should be skeptical of Republican candidates calling for smaller budgets and ask what they’d cut, President Barack Obama said Thursday. Appearing in a northeast Seattle neighborhood for a “backyard conversation” with about 35 local residents, Obama hit on two things that could be key to Washington’s U.S. Senate race: Federal spending and female voters.

Obama challenges GOP on cuts

SEATTLE — President Barack Obama used a “backyard conversation” in a northeast Seattle neighborhood to defend his policies and ask voters to demand details from Republicans.