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The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Spokane Mayor

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Incumbents slide, try to explain shift

Many of those elected Tuesday to serve in Spokane City Hall were the most outspoken ahead of the election that Proposition 1 would doom the economy. But the same electorate that chose those candidates also decided to give Proposition 1 – the Community Bill of Rights – a fighting chance. The ballot measure is still too close to call, although it lost ground in counting on Wednesday.

Doug Clark: Thank Mayor Bair for the one-term curse

Now comes that post-election moment for rationally minded pundits to scientifically pick apart how David Condon, a political upstart, made up a Goliath-size disadvantage to knock off a sitting Spokane mayor Tuesday night. Remember the August primary?

Health district funds chopped 8.7 percent

Local public health officials voted Wednesday to cut 8.7 percent from the Spokane Regional Health District’s budget for next year. The move, announced last month, included several layoffs and changes to programs that help babies and children receive care for birth defects and other special needs.

Candidates prepare for results

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Many candidates, issues familiar from past ballots

Washington voters checking their ballots this weekend for the first time may feel a sense of déjà vu. They voted last year on proposals to get the state out of the liquor business, and in 2008 to require more training for home health care workers. And while it isn’t immediately clear from the ballot language, the initiative on road and bridge tolls resurrects some of last year’s initiative requiring supermajorities in the Legislature.

Clark: To those who disgraced the law they swore to uphold

“Members of the Spokane Police Department will so conduct their public and private lives that they exemplify the high standards of integrity, trust, and morality demanded of a member of the Spokane Police Department.” –  Canon Four of the Spokane Police Department Policy Manual Code of Ethics Might I suggest some much-needed reading?

Has Condon closed the gap?

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The politics of ‘It totally sucks’

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Condon campaign donation scrutinized

The state Republican Party gave David Condon’s campaign for mayor $25,000 on Oct. 27. It’s easily the largest contribution to a Spokane candidate this year, and has supporters of Mayor Mary Verner calling foul. Verner’s backers accuse the Condon campaign of skirting campaign finance rules barring contributors from giving more than $800 to a candidate for each election. State parties, however, can give a candidate 80 cents per registered voter. In Spokane, that amounts to more than $110,000.

Millions spent for initiatives in final push

OLYMPIA – Led by a multimillion dollar battle over liquor sales in Washington, initiatives and candidates on the Nov. 8 ballot have spent more than $18 million to sway voters in the past three weeks. This may not surprise state residents who can’t turn on the television without seeing firefighters argue whether voters’ lives will be better or worse if state-run liquor stores go away. Other state initiative campaigns have their own TV messages, and campaigns are filling mailboxes with mailers.

2011 elections: Who’s spending what

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Conviction likely to bring changes at department

The conviction of Officer Karl Thompson could mean a significant shift in the running and politics of the Spokane Police Department, some city officials and police accountability advocates said after Wednesday’s verdict. Jeffry Finer, a civil rights attorney who represents the family of Otto Zehm, said he hopes the jury’s decision would lead to serious police reform after years of failed efforts.