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Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Mike Fagan

A candidate for Council District 1 (Northeast), City of Spokane in the 2015 Nov. 3 Washington General Election

Party: No party

Age: 61

City: Spokane, WA

Why he’s running: Fagan is running to help Spokane maintain the same character it had when he grew up in the city, but also move it forward and navigate its growth.

His pitch: Fagan describes himself as a constituent-facing elected official who has listened to the concerns of residents during his first two terms on the Spokane City Council. Unlike other council members, he says, he does not focus on “social issues” and does not have an “agenda.”

Age: 59 Jan. 1, 1960

Education: Graduated North Central High School in 1978.

Political experience: Fagan has served two terms on the City Council. Former president of Bemiss Neighborhood Council.

Work experience: Co-director of Voters Want More Choices, a group led by Tim Eyman that advocates for lower taxes. Worked as a purchasing officer of a communications company in California in the late 1980s until the mid-1990s. Worked at MOR Manufacturing in Post Falls, including as materials manager, from 1997 to 2007. Served in U.S. Army from 1978 until 1987. Co-hosts radio show about local politics.

Family: Married. Has three children.

Contact information

Race Results

Candidate Votes Pct
Mike Fagan (N) 3,566 54.32%
Randy Ramos 2,999 45.68%

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