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Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
Partly Cloudy Night 69° Partly Cloudy

Council District 1 (Northeast)

Election Results

Candidate Votes Pct
Mike Fagan (N) 3,566 54.32%
Randy Ramos 2,999 45.68%

* Race percentages are calculated with data from the Secretary of State's Office, which omits write-in votes from its calculations when there are too few to affect the outcome. The Spokane County Auditor's Office may have slightly different percentages than are reflected here because its figures include any write-in votes.

The Candidates

Mike Fagan

Party:
No party
Age:
61
City:
Spokane, WA

Why he’s running: Fagan is running to help Spokane maintain the same character it had when he grew up in the city, but also move it forward and navigate its growth.

His pitch: Fagan describes himself as a constituent-facing elected official who has listened to the concerns of residents during his first two terms on the Spokane City Council. Unlike other council members, he says, he does not focus on “social issues” and does not have an “agenda.”

Age: 59 Jan. 1, 1960

Education: Graduated North Central High School in 1978.

Political experience: Fagan has served two terms on the City Council. Former president of Bemiss Neighborhood Council.

Work experience: Co-director of Voters Want More Choices, a group led by Tim Eyman that advocates for lower taxes. Worked as a purchasing officer of a communications company in California in the late 1980s until the mid-1990s. Worked at MOR Manufacturing in Post Falls, including as materials manager, from 1997 to 2007. Served in U.S. Army from 1978 until 1987. Co-hosts radio show about local politics.

Family: Married. Has three children.

Randy Ramos

Party:
Age:
42
City:
Spokane, WA
Occupation:
Student recruiter

Randy Ramos

Age: 36 

His words: “I believe that it is the role of the government to protect the community’s most vulnerable people and to ensure that everyone has an equal opportunity to be successful. This means safeguarding the rights of workers and their families, providing a social safety net for people who need it, and supporting education.”

His pitch: A member of the Native community who will encourage people who feel disaffected from politics and government to get involved and have their concerns heard.

Notable experience: Recruiter at the Spokane Tribal College. Helped revive the quasi-governmental Native American Public Development Authority.

Education: Graduated from Lake Roosevelt High School in 1998. Earned associates degree from Spokane Tribal College in 2012.

Neighborhood: Nevada-Lidgerwood

Complete Coverage

One of three ethics complaints against Mayor Condon moves forward

The city’s Ethics Commission allowed one complaint against Spokane Mayor David Condon forward Wednesday, and dismissed others.

Infighting jeopardizes Spokane immigration ballot initiative

Petitioners hoping to reverse Spokane policy prohibiting police from questioning if someone is in the country illegally have collected enough signatures to put the issue before voters. But voters may not get a chance to consider the issue.

Spokane City Council limits participation in weekly public forums

On Monday Spokane City Council voted 5-2 to limit open forum speakers to once a month.

Spin Control: Fighting over initiatives is premature

New initiatives have interesting ideas, but aren’t serious yet.

Sunday Spin: Initiatives as tactics

OLYMPIA – Initiative entrepreneur Tim Eyman and his detractors squared off recently in the Capitol, where the ingenuity of their latest ideas was overshadowed by doubts about their earnestness.

Mayor Condon says to expect more of the same in second term

Citizens should expect more of the same from Mayor David Condon in the next four years as he embarks on his second term as Spokane mayor - the first time that’s happened since the 1970s.

Mapping the Vote: Council races suggest conservative/progressive split in city

For more than a generation, Spokane city politics divided mainly on geographic lines. Tuesday’s election suggests those lines may be disappearing and new coalitions are redrawing the electoral maps.

Mapping the Vote: Spokane Council Dist 1

Incumbent Councilman Mike Fagan received strong support from his base in Hillyard and other northern precincts to build his Election Night lead.

Spokane candidates on the lack of a city planning director

The city has been without a planning director since Scott Chesney was ousted last November.

Does Spokane have a sprawl problem? Spokane candidates speak

Yes. No. Depends who you ask, like we just did for you.

Spokane candidates talk about the city’s spokesmen and spokeswomen

Their answers vary, some say just two, others say it’s up to the mayor.

Truth-testing Spokane City Council candidates

The ballots are out, and candidates want your vote. But getting your vote can be a tricky proposition, so they try all kinds of methods. Pictures of them and their smiling spouse and kids. Dramatic commercials. A little bit of mud thrown at their opponent.

Candidates speak about Spokane’s lawsuit against agrochemical giant Monsanto

In August, the city of Spokane filed a lawsuit against the international agrochemical giant Monsanto, alleging that the company sold chemicals for decades that it knew were a danger to human and environmental health.

Truths, half truths and other campaign claims, Part 1

Election 2015 edition, on accusations of partisan agendas, cost of bike lanes and Chomsky.

Condon and Lichty on the Mayor Vs. City Council

Condon says things are pretty good. Lichty says not so much.

Spokane candidates on the Mayor Vs. the City Council

Everything’s golden, or This. Means. War.

Spokane candidates on their political heroes

Even politicians have heroes.

I-1366 is another swing at tax supermajority requirement

I-1366 tries to force the Legislature into a super-majority to pass tax increases.

Mike Fagan: I-1366 will restrain tax-happy Legislature

Constitutional amendment requiring two-thirds vote on taxes would force lawmakers to cut spending first.