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The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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As the Alaskan Way Viaduct comes down, so does a longtime shelter for Seattle’s homeless

The Alaskan Way Viaduct’s closure on Friday isn’t just a congestion headache for drivers that traveled on the road above. For decades, the viaduct provided shelter to homeless people below, who lived underneath decks of asphalt and steel that ribboned along the Puget Sound.

Washington legislative preview: Issues to watch in the coming months

Washington legislators return to Olympia on Monday expecting more money to flow into state coffers than ever before, but with demands to spend even more.

Report: Police did not violate policy in removing black man

The Kirkland Police Department has ruled that their officers did not violate internal policy when they helped the owner of a frozen yogurt shop expel a black man, Byron Ragland, from the store in November.

One-year sentence for man who smuggled guns to Turkey

A Seattle man has been sentenced to a year in prison for smuggling guns to Turkey – weapons that were ultimately intended for Kurdish fighters in Iraq.

Shutdown puts strain on hundreds of Native American tribes

Fallout from the federal government shutdown is hurting Native Americans as dwindling funds hamper access to health care and other services. The pain is especially deep in tribal communities with high rates of poverty and unemployment, where one person often supports an extended family.

Inslee pitches to Nevada outside 2020 spotlight on DC

Former Vice President Joe Biden and several nationally known senators are commanding most of the attention in Democrats’ early presidential angling, but there are several governors and mayors eyeing 2020 campaigns, as well.

Record wildfire-fighting budget requested by Washington Public Lands Commissioner Hilary Franz

An investment of $55 million would include a doubling of the state’s resources to fight wildfires. Franz, in an interview recorded for the Spokesman-Review’s Newsmakers podcast series, said such spending is needed as the Western states put greater pressure on shared resources to fight the larger fires occurring within their borders.

Sue Lani Madsen: Beyond abortion

In the case of post-abortion stress syndrome (PASS), politics has superseded medicine.

Court: Lawsuit in death of Susan Powell’s sons can proceed

A federal appeals court has ruled that a lawsuit against Washington state brought by the family of a Utah woman who disappeared nine years ago can proceed.

New orca calf seen among Puget Sound’s critically endangered killer whales

A new calf has been born to the critically endangered southern resident killer whales, researchers confirmed.

Seattle TV station employee fired after doctored footage of Trump’s Oval Office speech aired

On Tuesday night, an estimated 43.3 million Americans hunkered down to watch President Donald Trump make an Oval Office pitch for his border wall. But viewers in the Seattle area got a little more than they expected.

High court declines to review Seattle income tax ruling

The state Supreme Court has declined to immediately take up the lower-court ruling that killed Seattle’s income tax and is instead sending the case to the Court of Appeals.

Shawn Vestal: Rechecking the stats on pot and violence

Has legal pot ushered in a more violent era in Washington? That’s the possibility put forth in a New Yorker article by Malcolm Gladwell, the popular science writer and lightning rod who frequently draws criticism for elevating the hints and possibilities of scientific research into absolute natural laws.

Cashmere company Crunch Pak faces lawsuit over pollutant emissions

A Washington environmental organization is suing Cashmere-based apple snack company, Crunch Pak, over alleged violations to its state stormwater permit.

Former Tonasket officer says mayor asked him to change name because ‘Jose’ sounded too Hispanic

The city of Tonasket has disbanded its police department and a City Council member has called for the mayor to step down after an officer came forward with allegations that the mayor instructed him start using the name “Joseph” because “Jose” sounded “too Hispanic.”

The Air Force finally takes ownership of its first Boeing tanker – with serious misgivings

The U.S. Air Force on Thursday finally accepted and took ownership from Boeing of its first KC-46A air-to-air refueling tanker, though it pointed to flaws in the aircraft’s refueling systems that must be fixed.

‘Captain Underpants’ tried to outrun Pasco police. The tale of the short chase is going viral.

A pantless man ended up in jail Wednesday after trying to run from Pasco police.

Catholic Church challenges Congo’s surprise election result

Congo’s powerful Catholic church challenged the surprise win of opposition leader Felix Tshisekedi in the presidential election on Thursday, saying official results do not match the outcome compiled by its 40,000 observers at all polling stations across the troubled country.

Physicians criticize state lawsuits over pelvic mesh

Doctors who specialize in female pelvic medicine say lawsuits by four states, including Washington and California, over products used to treat pelvic floor disorders and incontinence might scare patients away from the best treatment options – or maybe even push the products off the market.

‘Seattle Squeeze’: City gears up for major highway closure

A major thoroughfare for commuters along downtown Seattle’s waterfront is shutting down for good, ushering in what officials say will be one of the most painful traffic periods in the history of the booming Pacific Northwest city.