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Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Rattlesnake Ridge still moving, but landslide predictions have stopped

Due to a sharp decrease in how quickly 20 acres are accelerating down Rattlesnake Ridge, officials say it’s difficult to predict when the impending landslide will happen.

Host father charged with hiding camera in students’ bathroom

A 64-year-old man has been charged with voyeurism for allegedly placing a camera in a bathroom of his home where he and his wife hosted exchange students attending North Seattle College.

Conviction against Brazil’s da Silva upheld, appeal expected

An appellate court on Wednesday delivered a significant blow to Brazil’s ex-President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, unanimously upholding a graft conviction against him and even adding years to his prison sentence in a major decision that could keep the former leader from running for a third term despite holding a lead in the polls.

Washington state panel OKs low carbon fuels standard

A Washington state House committee on Tuesday approved a measure that would require fuel producers and importers to reduce greenhouse gas emissions associated with gasoline and other transportation fuels.

Egypt’s military arrests presidential hopeful, ex-general

Egypt’s military on Tuesday arrested its former chief of staff, who was planning to run in upcoming elections against President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi, accusing him of inciting against the armed forces and forgery, in what appeared to be a calculated move to push him out of the race.

County prosecutor calls for repeal of state’s death penalty

King County Prosecutor Dan Satterberg is urging lawmakers to repeal the state’s death penalty.

Grants fund cities’ switch to LED bulbs

DJ’s Electrical spent time replacing streetlights in Battle Ground with LED bulbs. The change to the city’s 2,300 streetlights from high-pressure sodium to LED bulbs is part of an energy-saving initiative in the city.

Libraries, readers on hold for ‘Fire and Fury’

Demand for the book has been “Fury”-ous, so local library patrons will have to wait a while to check out the best-seller by Michael Wolff.

Women will march again with aim to become a political force

A year after more than 1 million people rallied at women’s marches worldwide with a message of female empowerment and protest against President Donald Trump, activists will return to the streets this weekend in hopes of converting anger and enthusiasm into political force.

Umbrella mistaken for weapon causes hospital lockdown

An umbrella sparked a scare at a Seattle-area hospital after it was mistaken for a rifle.

Washington adds 6,100 jobs in December; jobless rate at 4.5 percent

Washington’s economy added 6,100 jobs in December and the state’s seasonally adjusted monthly unemployment rate came in at 4.5 percent, according to the Employment Security Department.

Northwest immigrant activist says she faces deportation

A longtime activist for illegal immigrants in the Northwest says she herself is now facing deportation.

Russian officials move to shut Navalny’s foundation

Russia’s Justice Ministry said Monday it has filed a lawsuit to shut down a company used by opposition leader Alexei Navalny that is being used to finance his political campaigning.

Washington state agency stops giving personal info to feds

The Washington state Department of Licensing says it will no longer release personal information to federal immigration authorities without a court order unless required by law.

Bellingham city officials settle excessive force lawsuit

Officials in the western Washington city of Bellingham have agreed to pay $100,000 to settle a lawsuit alleging that two police officers used excessive force during a 2015 arrest.

Gov. Inslee’s climate-change advisers draw scrutiny

As Gov. Jay Inslee presses an ambitious carbon-tax plan for Washington state, two of his climate-change policy advisers have drawn scrutiny.

U.S. review shows pesticides harm threatened salmon, whales

Federal scientists have determined that a family of widely used pesticides poses a threat to dozens of endangered and threatened species, including Pacific salmon, Atlantic sturgeon and Puget Sound orcas.

Justices to hear Washington appeal of salmon habitat order

The U.S. Supreme Court will hear Washington state’s culvert case this year, heating up a 17-year legal battle over the state’s duty to protect and restore salmon habitat as part of its obligation to respect tribes’ treaty fishing rights.

Health insurance sign-ups close Monday in Washington

Monday is the deadline to sign up for individual health insurance coverage through Washington HealthPlanFinder.

Gov. Inslee wants Washington removed from drilling plan

Gov. Jay Inslee is asking U.S. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke to remove Washington, along with the entire Pacific coastline, from a list of proposed sites for potential offshore oil and gas drilling.