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Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Ben Stuckart

A candidate for Spokane mayor, City of Spokane in the 2019 Washington General Election, Nov. 5

Party: No party

Age: 49

City: Spokane, WA

Why running: “I’ve seen a lot of great things happen, I also see a lot of challenges. I want to continue working for the citizens of Spokane,” Stuckart said. “I think I’ve been very effective as a council president and we’ve done a lot of great programs, but I want to see some of them to the finish.”

His pitch: Stuckart said he believes he’s the best candidate to address the city’s housing crisis, which he believes is the root of the homelessness issue.

He also points to his accomplishments as the city’s legislative leader for nearly eight years and the city’s continued economic growth.

Political experience: Served two terms as City Council president.

Work experience: Former executive director of Communities in Schools of Spokane County. Former regional manager at TicketsWest, 2001 to 2007. Spokesman for the 2010 campaign in support of the Children’s Investment Fund initiative, which voters  rejected.

Education: Graduated from Lewis and Clark High School in 1990. Earned bachelor’s degree in political science from Gonzaga University in 2000 and master’s degree in organizational leadership from Gonzaga University in 2006.

Family: Married. Has no children.

Contact information

Race Results

Candidate Votes Pct
Nadine Woodward 34,531 50.62%
Ben Stuckart (N) 33,682 49.38%

Details & headlines >>

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