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Tuesday, November 12, 2019  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Staff > News > Pia Hallenberg > Stories
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Most Recent Stories

News >  Spokane
Sept. 20, 2008, midnight
No matter where you are in Odessa this weekend, you can smell the sausage. And it’s really difficult to leave town without at least one bag of homebaked cookies. The tiny central Washington town celebrates its German heritage with Deutschesfest, which runs through Sunday.

News >  Spokane
Sept. 15, 2008, midnight
Cindy Scinto is still going strong, and that’s quite an accomplishment. The Spokane woman received a heart transplant in 2005 after she had had so many near-fatal heart attacks she said her doctors stopped counting. Her own heart was patched up and failing rapidly. Then Danielle Martinez died, and her 28-year-old heart was transplanted into Scinto’s 44-year-old chest. From then on, things began to look a lot better for Scinto.

News >  Spokane
Sept. 13, 2008, midnight
The pile of railroad ties that caught fire Thursday evening next to the Spokane Interstate Fairgrounds continued to smolder Friday. The property is owned by Wal-Mart, which has hired an independent contractor to assist the Spokane Valley Fire Department.

News >  Spokane
Sept. 11, 2008, midnight
Authorities say Dominik Adams was barely a month old when he was beaten so badly his skull was fractured. On Monday, his father, Bobby Daniel Adams, 25, of Ponderay, Idaho, was charged with felony injury to a child. Adams is being held in Bonner County Jail on a $100,000 bond.

News >  Spokane
Sept. 10, 2008, midnight
A Spokane police officer is on paid administrative leave while under investigation for an alleged misdemeanor assault that occurred when the officer was on duty Friday night. The incident allegedly took place in the 3200 block of West Hoffman Avenue during the arrest of a man who led police on a lengthy pursuit through the Shadle Park area, said Officer Jennifer DeRuwe, of the Spokane Police Department.

News >  Spokane
Sept. 8, 2008, midnight
There is a place in the middle of Washington where sandhill cranes stop for a rest and a snack in the spring, before they continue their migration. They congregate in the fields and wetlands around Othello, Wash., where they stand around in flocks, omit throaty whoops, and suddenly take off in a flutter of giant wings and dangly legs, as if on a secret signal. Toward the end of March is prime crane watching time, but that doesn’t mean Seep Lakes and Potholes Reservoir Wildlife Areas aren’t worth a visit at a different time of the year.

News >  Spokane
Sept. 8, 2008, midnight
Summer vacation is over and it’s time for students across the Inland Northwest to write their “what I did this summer” essays. So, what did you do this summer? I know what I did: writing for this spot in the Monday paper I’ve driven close to 2,000 miles around the Inland Northwest, looking for road trip destinations. During that time, I watched the wheat ripen and I saw fresh hay bales the color of Granny Smith apples being stacked. I’ve assessed rumps of yearlings and squinted at a blue sky for a rain cloud that was never there. It seems like the sun was shining all summer – except for that brief hailstorm in Missoula. I’ve hiked through sagebrush for miles and miles, the sand and the rock so hot the scent of warm sage made me sneeze and think of beef stew.

News >  Idaho
Sept. 1, 2008, midnight
What do John Wayne and Pippi Longstocking have in common? They both rode Appaloosa horses. Pippi’s spotted steed, Lilla Gubben, could walk up stairs and do tricks, and John Wayne rode the stallion Zip Cochise in the Western “El Dorado.” It’s a versatile breed.

News >  Idaho
Sept. 1, 2008, midnight
The name white settlers gave them was a mistake. The Nez Perce – which loosely translates to “pierced noses” – never practiced nose piercing. Hunters and gatherers, formidable horse people and warriors, they were given the name Nez Perce by early French settlers.

News >  Spokane
Aug. 25, 2008, midnight
If you’re already in Metaline Falls, there’s an underground treat waiting for you just a bit farther north. In Crawford State Park – which is so close to the Canadian border that you can walk there – you’ll find Gardner Cave. “We are kind of in the Siberia of the Washington parks system,” said Julia Mathison, interpretive assistant at the caves. “I don’t have a TV signal, I have no Internet, no cell phones work up here, I barely have radio, but I love it out here.”

News >  Spokane
Aug. 25, 2008, midnight
The drive from Spokane to Metaline Falls is worth the trip on its own. Highway 20 will take you along the Pend Oreille River, between the mountains rising on both sides as the road twists and turns its way toward Canada. Along the river there are many smaller resorts, some with rooms, some open for camping and RVs.

News >  Spokane
Aug. 24, 2008, midnight
The first thing you hear is drums. Deep, rumbling and rhythmic, the steady beat travels through the trees at the park. Then you hear the jingle of silver bells, almost at the same time you hear singing, and then you know you’ve reached the powwow. The Spokane Falls Northwest Indian Encampment and Pow Wow began Friday evening at Riverfront Park, and Saturday was completely occupied by dancing.

News >  Spokane
Aug. 18, 2008, midnight
It’s harvest time on the Palouse. Almost anywhere you stop amid the rolling, golden wheat fields, you can hear the hum of combines and see the white harvest dust clouds rise on the horizon. Heavy grain trucks rumble by on narrow roads, tractors scramble back and forth, coolers sit in the shade of old trees. But there are many other things going on around the Palouse besides farming. Here’s a “Palouse loop” that includes art, great food, 100-year-old newspapers, a science center and a view that will take your breath away.

News >  Spokane
Aug. 18, 2008, midnight
There’s a big black guinea pig named King Kong, butterflies and snakes, turtles and fish, a handful of curious rats and a bird named Steve. They’ve all found a home at the Palouse Discovery Science Center in Pullman, some from rescue and one simply by showing up. “I got home one day, and I heard this twittering up in one of my trees,” Victoria Scalise, the center’s executive director, said of the day she met Steve. “And I looked up, and there he was. My son was going to climb up and get him, but when I held out my finger he simply landed on it and that was that.”

News >  Spokane
Aug. 11, 2008, midnight
When the mercury creeps upward almost as fast as gas prices, it’s pretty miserable to be stuck in the city. Everyone eventually wants to go to “the lake” for a swim, but what’s a person to do without a cabin, a car or an extra $50 for gas? Here’s an idea: Take the bus. It’s cheap, it’s easy to figure out and Spokane-area buses have air-conditioning. The easiest lake to reach is Medical Lake. Get on Route 62 at the downtown plaza, ride west for a good half hour, and it’ll drop you off right at the entrance to Waterfront Park.

News >  Spokane
Aug. 11, 2008, midnight
Charmaine Gural should have a bumper sticker that reads: “Brakes for snakes.” On a morning drive inside Turnbull National Wildlife Refuge south of Cheney, she carefully stopped, got out of her car and encouraged a snake to leave the warm gravel on the road. “They say there aren’t any rattlesnakes out here, but I don’t know,” she said, as she climbed back into her car.

News >  Spokane
Aug. 10, 2008, midnight
The Columbia River Road wildfire, just west of Nespelem, grew to more than 21,000 acres Saturday. “It is about 15 percent contained at this point,” said Karen Ripley, spokeswoman for the Columbia River Road wildfire. “Essentially there is good containment on the southern edge of the fire, but the winds continue to push it toward the northwest.”

News >  Spokane
Aug. 10, 2008, midnight
Here’s a tip: When participating in KSPS’s KidsDay at Riverfront Park, hold off on the face paint until after you’ve run through the Rotary Fountain. “It’s just about all come off by now,” said Sandy Roda, of Spokane, as she watched her two nieces play in the fountain. “They’ve had a blast here today. We’ve done the jumping castle, face painting, and we’ve gotten balloon hats; it’s just been really nice.” Roda’s 4-month-old son was sound asleep in the stroller.

News >  Spokane
Aug. 9, 2008, midnight
When it becomes difficult to put food on the table, some families turn to food banks for help. Feeding a family that way is a challenge – but when you add a few pets, things can get really tough. . “More people are calling and showing up, asking for pet food, than ever before,” said Dori Peck, outreach coordinator for the Humane Society in Spokane. “Last year we gave out 20,000 pounds of pet food to low-income and homeless people. We ask for basic information and log people, but we don’t turn anyone away.”

News >  Idaho
Aug. 4, 2008, midnight
Everyone knows that skiers flock to Schweitzer Mountain Resort every winter to enjoy world-class skiing just a short drive from downtown Sandpoint. But for those not so comfortable on the slopes, summer may be a better time to visit. Skiers sure will be jealous that for just $15 you can get a daylong lift ticket.

News >  Spokane
Aug. 4, 2008, midnight
There’s no mistaking the excited squeals that echo off the cement walls at the Riverfront Park Pavilion: the rides remain a summer hit. Sure, the park turned 30 years old this weekend, and from an adult’s perspective not much is new. But judging from the hordes of sunscreen-scented kids that run from ride to ride, that really doesn’t matter. Lines still form at the bumper cars, the tiny little train and the scary black Spider.

News >  Spokane
July 28, 2008, midnight
You know you’re close to Walla Walla when the brown scablands are interrupted by fuzzy-looking green patches on the hillsides. Those dark green patches are vineyards. The other indicator is the increased frequency of “Please don’t drink and drive” signs. The Walla Walla Valley has become synonymous with great wine. A combination of ideal soil, long, hot summer days and cool nights has turned Walla Walla into one of the more successful wine producing areas in the country.

News >  Spokane
July 28, 2008, midnight
The Coeur d’Alene Library has gone to the movies. Four Wednesdays in a row, beginning on Aug. 6, there will be free children’s movies shown in the Shirley Parker Theater at the library at 11 a.m. “Depending on how long they are, you may get one or two each time,” said Peggy Smith, youth services clerk at the library.

News >  Spokane
July 26, 2008, midnight
As Cliff SiJohn tells the story, a few teenage girls and a few young boys were asked to move almost 1,000 head of horses from around Post Falls, over Mica Peak and into the land around Worley, Idaho. This was soon after a coalition of American Indian warriors defeated Col. Edward J. Steptoe at Rosalia in 1858.

News >  Spokane
July 21, 2008, midnight
It was a trip to Sherman Pass outside Republic, Wash., that got Shannon Ashworth hooked on ghost towns. Using the book “Ghost Towns of the Northwest” by Norman D. Weis as her guide, Ashworth headed north from her home in Rosalia for a day of ghost-town hunting. “The maps in there are pretty dang accurate,” said Ashworth, who’s an office manager for a company in Colfax.