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Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Summer Days There Are 77 Days Left Of Summer - What Are You Going To Do?

Beth Kowal Mead

School’s been out for less than a week for most of you, and you’re bored already? There are two and a half months of freedom, relaxation and no structured education ahead of you! We’ve been waiting for this for 180 days!

So no more complaining to your friends that there’s nothing to do around here. Our Generation’s Teen Advisory Council has come up with 77 things to do, one for every day left in your summer. With so many things happening, you can’t go wrong.

From vegging out to staying active to helping others out, there are endless possibilities for excitement. This is what we came up with - some are fun, some are for laughs - maybe it will spark a few ideas of your own!

1. Jam 39 tiny marshmallows up your nose and try to sneeze them out.

2. Challenge your friends to a water-drinking contest, one Dixie cup at a time. The first one who throws up wins.

3. Go to the public library and look through old annuals for teachers and parents.

4. Practice catching mosquitoes with one hand.

5. Go to People’s Park.

6. Plan a river-rafting trip.

7. Go to an Indians game.

8. Go fishing.

9. Have a belly-flop contest.

10. Go wind surfing on the Columbia.

11. Dye your hair with Kool-Aid.

12. Play an unusual game, like rugby or lacrosse.

13. Become obsessed with a celebrity.

14. Go up to strangers in the mall and hug them.

15. Wear a sweatsuit to the beach.

16. Glue money to the sidewalk, stand back and watch.

17. On really hot days, go around saying “Hot enough for ya’?”

18. Go to the Stateline Stadium and Speedway’s Demolition Derby and fireworks show on July 3.

19. Stay awake through an hour of C-Span.

20. Go into a store and talk backwards to the clerk.

21. Create a foreign language with a friend.

22. Do a cartwheel at church.

23. Pick a team in Hoopfest at random and go to all of their games with a huge poster.

24. Stage an argument with a friend in a public place.

25. Go to a fast-food restaurant and order your food in Spanish.

26. Drive the Interstate.

27. Go to Luigi’s and order a burrito.

28. Search the city for kids’ lemonade stands. Buy the whole pitcher.

29. Write a poem for your mom.

30. Hunt for the lion.

31. Comb thrift shops for eight-track tapes.

32. Have a blast at KidsWeek in Riverfront Park and throughout Spokane, Aug. 10-18. Don’t forget the Battle of the Bands on the 17th in Riverfront Park.

33. Go to McDonald’s and order a cheeseburger, no cheese.

34. Advertise a topless car wash, then just don’t wash the tops of the cars.

35. Get two friends with cars and drive side-by-side up Division at 10 miles an hour.

36. Wear blue eye shadow.

37. Get an inverted mohawk.

38. Pierce something.

39. Ride in a taxi.

40. Pay someone’s parking meter for no reason.

41. Go Christmas caroling.

42. Make a batch of cookies for an old lady in the neighborhood.

43. Silly string a white car.

44. Rent a limo for the night.

45. Buy a gold fish.

46. Take up a musical instrument.

47. Go swimming at midnight.

48. Have a slumber party.

49. Play truth or dare.

50. Buy a plastic pool and sit in it in the front yard.

51. Build a potato gun.

52. Have a BYOB party Bring Your Own Burger.

53. Set fire to a Twinkie.

54. Have a Jell-O fight.

55. Throw pebbles at your significant other’s window and sing a song.

56. Try to floss your nose with a piece of spaghetti.

57. Have a movie marathon of classics.

58. Learn how to shoot pool.

59. Go garage sale shopping.

60. Balance yourself over an outhouse toilet seat without touching it or falling over.

61. Adopt a river. Raft down part of a river, picking up trash as you go.

62. Spend all day at a dollar theater. You’ll still only spend $4.

63. Hit the Valley Christian Thrift Store on Mondays. Fill a bag for only $5.

64. Go horseback riding.

65. Order a pizza party for your next-door neighbor.

66. Instead of egging someone’s car, wash it in the middle of the night.

67. Go to the fair and try to sample the prize-winning cookies.

68. See a play.

69. Cruise Riverside or Sherman Avenue (in Coeur d’Alene) on your bike.

70. Cook breakfast on your driveway.

71. Eat every meal at Pig Out in the Park for five days straight.

72. Bike the entire Centennial Trail 73. Play with your little brother or sister for a day.

74. Hang out at Hastings and listen to all the CDs on their headphones.

75. Sleep in a tent in your back yard. Read using a flashlight.

76. Learn about another culture.

77. Wander around aimlessly, saying, “There’s nothing to do in this town.”

MEMO: This sidebar appeared with the story: MAKE A DIFFERENCE THIS SUMMER BY VOLUNTEERING Why not fill your spare time this summer helping people who need it, or volunteering time to an issue you care about? The Student, Leadership and Involvement group, or SLI, has gathered this list of worthy causes. If you’re interested in getting involved with SLI, a teen service organization, call 626-0758. Camp Fire Boys and Girls could use teens 16 and older to help out in their store, in the office with mailings and computer work, and as instructors in teaching younger boys and girls. Call 747-6191. The Spokane Food Bank always appreciates individual and group volunteers to sort and repackage food, and help with the Brown Bag program for elderly shut-ins. Call 534-6678. Cancer Patient Care is looking for volunteers to sort, organize and stock items in the Thrift Store and Book Room. If interested, call 456-0446. The Deaconess Child Care Center needs teens 16 and older to answer phones, perform office work, help with field trips, assist with arts and crafts and be general helpers. Call Joan (458-7427) to help with young children. The Southcrest Nursing Home could use teens 14 and older to visit with residents, write letters, work on garden projects and other things. Call 456-8300. Walk the dogs and groom and feed the animals at the Spokane Humane Society. Call 467-5235. Teens age 14-18 are needed in the Junior Volunteer Program at Valley Hospital and Medical Center. Call 924-6650, ext. 5415, or drop by for an application.

This sidebar appeared with the story: MAKE A DIFFERENCE THIS SUMMER BY VOLUNTEERING Why not fill your spare time this summer helping people who need it, or volunteering time to an issue you care about? The Student, Leadership and Involvement group, or SLI, has gathered this list of worthy causes. If you’re interested in getting involved with SLI, a teen service organization, call 626-0758. Camp Fire Boys and Girls could use teens 16 and older to help out in their store, in the office with mailings and computer work, and as instructors in teaching younger boys and girls. Call 747-6191. The Spokane Food Bank always appreciates individual and group volunteers to sort and repackage food, and help with the Brown Bag program for elderly shut-ins. Call 534-6678. Cancer Patient Care is looking for volunteers to sort, organize and stock items in the Thrift Store and Book Room. If interested, call 456-0446. The Deaconess Child Care Center needs teens 16 and older to answer phones, perform office work, help with field trips, assist with arts and crafts and be general helpers. Call Joan (458-7427) to help with young children. The Southcrest Nursing Home could use teens 14 and older to visit with residents, write letters, work on garden projects and other things. Call 456-8300. Walk the dogs and groom and feed the animals at the Spokane Humane Society. Call 467-5235. Teens age 14-18 are needed in the Junior Volunteer Program at Valley Hospital and Medical Center. Call 924-6650, ext. 5415, or drop by for an application.

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