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Friday, June 5, 2020  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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More Than 1 Million Entries At Your Fingertips

By Donna Potter Phillips The Spoke

FOR THE RECORD (July 30, 1997): Phone number: The telephone number for ordering the new 1870 Census Index CD-ROM from Heritage Quest is (800) 658-7755. The 800 number listed in the “Heritage Hunting” genealogical column in Sunday’s IN Life section had technical problems.

Imagine checking the entire 1870 Pennsylvania census index for your ancestors while sitting at your own computer, all comfy, dressed in robe and slippers.

This is entirely possible with the new 1870 Census Index CD-ROM from Heritage Quest.

The folks at Heritage Quest and American Genealogical Lending Library combined efforts to extract from the original census the names of the head of household for all cities and counties in Pennsylvania.

Previous CDs of the Pennsylvania census offered eastern or western counties, but not the central counties. This new disk includes all counties and has more than 1 million entries.

Listed are all head of household names and any person with different surnames, all men older than 50 and all women older than 70. The disk comes with a small booklet explaining exactly how to run the disk and how to best use the index. It’s a snap!

The CD can be ordered for $39.95, postpaid, from AGLL, P.O. Box 329, Bountiful, UT 84011-0329, or by calling (800) 298-5468.

This fantastic CD-ROM disk represents much of what I have been discussing in recent columns. Genealogy and technology have teamed up to bring information to you in faster and cheaper ways.

Just two years ago you could not have this information at home for any price. One year ago you had to purchase two expensive disks and they still didn’t cover the entire state. Now, for five cents less than $40, you have the privilege of sitting in your robe and slippers doing thorough genealogy census work at home. Imagine! If you have genealogy work to do in 1870 in the state of Pennsylvania, check out this disk.

Charles Hansen, an ever-vigilant member of the Eastern Washington Genealogical Society, shares these questions for us to ponder: All genealogists like to share information, but is our right of privacy being observed on the Internet?

If genealogists share their GEDCOM files with other researchers, will their privacy be respected? Will others post your information on the Web for everyone to see and use? Should we be asked before our vital records are added to a Web page? Should we only share information about dead ancestors? Is it OK to have your mother’s maiden name listed on a web page?

Banks use our mothers’ maiden names as passwords; will those reading the Web page listing your mother’s maiden name use it for research - or to open a charge card in your name? Will Aunt Mabel sue if you put her age on your Web site?

These questions and others should be a concern to all genealogists. Researchers should obtain permission before listing any living person on a Web site.

I wish this type of warning weren’t necessary, but the Internet is a great resource both for genealogists and con artists.

If you post your entire GEDCOM file on the Net, there is a program called GEDCLEAN that will remove the names of living people and will print “Living” in place of the name. Or, you might tweak your GEDCOM file before submitting it so it begins far enough back that it does not contain any living people.

Thanks, Charles, for giving us pause to consider our actions regarding our genealogy and the Internet.

, DataTimes MEMO: Donna Potter Phillips welcomes letters from readers. Write to her at The Spokesman-Review, Features Department, P.O. Box 2160, Spokane, WA 99210. For a response, please include a self-addressed, stamped envelope.

The following fields overflowed: CREDIT = Donna Potter Phillips The Spokesman-Review

Donna Potter Phillips welcomes letters from readers. Write to her at The Spokesman-Review, Features Department, P.O. Box 2160, Spokane, WA 99210. For a response, please include a self-addressed, stamped envelope.

The following fields overflowed: CREDIT = Donna Potter Phillips The Spokesman-Review

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