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At the least, ask doctor to clarify

Peter Gott United Media

Dear Dr. Gott: I’m a 53-year-old Caucasian male. Six years ago, I had a prostate infection, after which I underwent biopsy, ultrasound and PSA. Four years ago, I changed urologists because I moved. He insisted on another ultrasound, examination and PSA. He now says I need still another set of testing so he can compare the results. I think because of the cost, limited insurance and no apparent problems, this is unnecessary. Do you?

Dear Reader: Yes, I agree. But you’d better question your present urologist further. Did he, for example, obtain the records from the original doctor who tested you and performed the biopsy? Perhaps this information would provide the comparison he needs.

What about the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood test? Was it normal, or has there been a problem? Finally, in the new doctor’s defense, the results of the new testing may have been equivocal. In this instance, re-testing would be appropriate.

On the other hand, if the results of your former – and current – testing were normal, I see no point in simply mowing the same lawn; an annual rectal examination and PSA determination should suffice.

Again, you should review the situation with the new urologist, ask him questions and discover the rationale behind his recommendation. Then you will be able to make an educated choice about how to proceed.

To give you related information, I am sending you a copy of my Health Report “The Prostate Gland.” Other readers who would like a copy should send a long, self-addressed, stamped envelope and $2 to Newsletter, P.O. Box 167, Wickliffe, OH 44092. Be sure to mention the title.

Dear Dr. Gott: I’m a 25-year-old female who gave birth to my son almost a year ago. We could not understand, after reading literature, why anyone would not breastfeed her baby, yet within a week all the negative aspects became apparent: painful nipples, little rest, around-the-clock feedings, and, ultimately, fat and flabby breasts. Is there a remedy? The pain is gone now that he is weaned, but will my breasts ever have the shape they once did?

Dear Reader: Breasts customarily lose their shape after pregnancy, especially multiple pregnancies in women with heavy breasts. These changes may be accentuated by breastfeeding.

I am not aware of any nonsurgical method that alters flabby breasts once the changes have occurred. However, plastic surgeons are very skilled at correcting such a situation. Ask your obstetrician for a referral to this type of specialist.

To give you related information, I am sending you a copy of my Health Report “Breast Cancer and Disorders.” Other readers who would like a copy should send a long, self-addressed, stamped envelope and $2 to Newsletter, P.O. Box 167, Wickliffe, OH 44092. Be sure to mention the title.

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