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New $10 sports yellow, orange, red


The new $10 bill note became the third bill denomination to be given the colors red, yellow and orange as part of the government's effort to thwart counterfeiters. It is scheduled to go into circulation in 2006. The $50 bill was given a similar makeover last year and the $20 was redesigned in 2003.
 (Associated Press / The Spokesman-Review)
The new $10 bill note became the third bill denomination to be given the colors red, yellow and orange as part of the government's effort to thwart counterfeiters. It is scheduled to go into circulation in 2006. The $50 bill was given a similar makeover last year and the $20 was redesigned in 2003. (Associated Press / The Spokesman-Review)
Associated Press

WASHINGTON – Hooray for the red, yellow and orange! Those are the colors featured on the newly redesigned $10 bill, the third currency denomination to add splashes of color to the traditional green of U.S. currency.

Some 800 million of the new bills will be put into circulation starting early next year in the government’s latest effort to stay ahead of tech-savvy counterfeiters.

The new bill features a red image of the Statue of Liberty’s torch on the left side of a revised portrait of Alexander Hamilton, the first secretary of the Treasury, who is shown without the traditional oval frame around his portrait.

Also highlighted in red is the phrase from the Constitution “We the People” on the right side of Hamilton’s portrait. The bill overall has a subtle orange background. The yellow is seen in small 10s around the torch on the front of the bill. There are also small yellow 10s to the right of the U.S. Treasury building, which remains on the back of the bill.

The makeover of the $10 bill follows similar colorization of the $20 bill in 2003 and the $50 bill last year.

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