Arrow-right Camera

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Sunday, July 5, 2020  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
Clear Night 67° Clear
News >  Features

Annie’s Mailbox: Talk to brother about heirlooms

Kathy Mitchell And Marcy Sugar

Dear Annie: My brother is married to a woman I will call “Devon.” She is an only child and accustomed to having her way.

Our last surviving parent recently passed away, and Devon tried to manipulate the division of the estate. My brother took possession of almost all of my father’s belongings, and I should have had most of Mom’s things, but Devon wanted them for herself. And she got them.

I recently discovered she and my brother deceived me about items that were supposed to go to me but are now in their possession. I have grandchildren (which Devon will never have) and would like some of those heirlooms to pass on to them.

My brother is henpecked and does whatever Devon wants. Should I confront them or remain silent? – Florida Sister

Dear Florida: Who handled the estate? Was there a legal will giving you possession of these items? If your parents had a lawyer, there should be a record of how the estate was to be distributed. If there was only a verbal understanding, you can still take your brother to court and a judge might agree that you are entitled to these things.

Before taking legal action, we suggest you talk to your brother directly. Explain how unfair it is that he got the bulk of both Dad’s and Mom’s estate, and that for the sake of your relationship, he needs to be more equitable. If he still won’t part with anything, ask whether he would be willing to specify in his will that these heirlooms go to your grandchildren at his death.

Dear Annie: I live in a small town in Kentucky that has a lot of fast-food restaurants.

One of our local places employs a girl who I know has genital herpes. My family and friends all know and have stopped eating there, but I think other patrons should be aware of the herpes girl. I know for a fact she is still having sex with numerous people and not telling them she is infected.

Do we need to contact the local health department? The management at the restaurant put her at the drive-through window so she would not be handling food, but she still handles our money. What are the chances that we could catch this STD? – Grossed Out in Kentucky

Dear Kentucky: Unless the customers are having sex with the girl while they’re waiting for their order, the chances of catching herpes are slim to none. Herpes is transmitted by skin-to-skin contact with an infected area. Please stop treating this girl as a pariah. Her condition affects you only if you are intimate with her. For more information and reassurance, contact the American Social Health Association Herpes Resource Center at ashastd.org/herpes or (800) 227-8922.

Annie’s Mailbox is written by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar, longtime editors of the Ann Landers column.

Subscribe to the Coronavirus newsletter

Get the day’s latest Coronavirus news delivered to your inbox by subscribing to our newsletter.



Swedish Thoracic Surgery: Partners in patient care

 (Courtesy Bergman Draper Oslund Udo)
Sponsored

Matt Bergman knows the pain and anger that patients with mesothelioma feel.