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Monday, October 26, 2020  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Federal judge stops Texas law on women’s health

Associated Press
AUSTIN, Texas — A federal judge today stopped Texas from preventing Planned Parenthood from getting state funds through the Women’s Health Program. U.S. District Judge Lee Yeakel in Austin ruled there is sufficient evidence that a law banning Planned Parenthood from the program is unconstitutional. He imposed an injunction against enforcing it until he can hear full arguments. The law passed last year by the Republican-controlled Legislature forbids state agencies from providing funds to an organization affiliated with abortion providers. Eight Planned Parenthood clinics that do not provide abortions sued the state. The clinics say the law unconstitutionally restricts their freedom of speech and association. “The court is particularly influenced by the potential for immediate loss of access to necessary medical services by several thousand Texas women,” Yeakel wrote in his ruling. “The record before the court at this juncture reflects uncertainty as to the continued viability of the Texas Women’s Health Program.” Texas officials have said that if the state is forced to include Planned Parenthood, they will likely shut down the program that serves basic health care and contraception to 130,000 poor women. The court’s decision comes after the federal government cut off funding to Texas because of the state requirement. Federal officials said the rule violates federal law by restricting women from choosing the qualified medical provider of their choice. Texas Gov. Rick Perry promised to make up for the lost federal funds. State health officials say maintaining the program was cheaper than allowing it to expire, because ending the program would result in a spike in unplanned pregnancies among poor women who rely on Medicaid, which is also funded by the state. Yeakel’s decision is temporary. A final decision will come after he presides over a full trial. Whatever decision he reaches will likely be appealed.
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