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2 sides to NJ teens accused of killing girl

Young people on BMX bikes talk together after visiting a shrine for Autumn Pasquale Wednesday, Oct. 24, 2012, in Clayton, N.J., near where the missing 12-year-old girl's body was found in a home's recycling bin. The body of Autumn Pasquale was found around 10 p.m. Monday, just blocks away from her house. Two teenage brothers were charged Tuesday with murdering Pasquale over her BMX bicycle. Pasquale, who had been missing since the weekend, prompting a frantic search by her small hometown until her body was found stuffed into a home recycling bin. (Mel Evans / Associated Press)
Young people on BMX bikes talk together after visiting a shrine for Autumn Pasquale Wednesday, Oct. 24, 2012, in Clayton, N.J., near where the missing 12-year-old girl's body was found in a home's recycling bin. The body of Autumn Pasquale was found around 10 p.m. Monday, just blocks away from her house. Two teenage brothers were charged Tuesday with murdering Pasquale over her BMX bicycle. Pasquale, who had been missing since the weekend, prompting a frantic search by her small hometown until her body was found stuffed into a home recycling bin. (Mel Evans / Associated Press)
Geoff Mulvihillkathy Matheson Associated Press

CLAYTON, N.J. (AP) — Some residents of Clayton say people suspected two teenage brothers accused of murdering a 12-year-old girl of being troublemakers, but not of being violent.

The boys, ages 15 and 17, are accused of killing seventh-grader Autumn Pasquale who disappeared Saturday and stuffing her body into a recycling bin. The body was found Monday night.

Beverly Davis, who says she went to school with Autumn’s father and the suspects’ mother, said the boys stole one of her children’s bikes. It was the type of theft others also say the brothers were known for committing.

But some residents who observed the boys found them to act the right way around adults, to smile and be courteous.

Said 16-year-old Na’eem Williams of the slaying, “I know they didn’t do nothing like that.”

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