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This column reflects the opinion of the writer. Learn about the differences between a news story and an opinion column.

Opinion >  Column

The Slice: Vintage billiards trophy finds way home

Paul Turner is taking some time off this summer. In his absence, we dive into the archives at Slice Central. Today, we revisit July 12, 2005.

Everyone can breathe easier. Nick Britz of Browne’s Addition found a 1916 SR-sponsored pocket billiards trophy on an online auction site, being sold by someone in Oregon. And Britz, a pool player himself, has brought the 17-inch trophy back home to the Lilac City, where it belongs.

Just wondering: Ever been involved in or heard about a conversation that was made somewhat confusing by virtue of the fact one person was saying “Eastern” and meaning Eastern Washington University while another was saying “Eastern” and meaning Eastern State Hospital?

Slice answer: Jim Eggers said Marianne Mishima was the best-looking Spokane TV news anchor ever.

And he insisted that being married to her did not influence his vote.

The chilling specter of accountability: “I drive down Post Street every weekday morning on my way to work and I try to keep to the speed limit,” wrote Evelyn Easley. “One morning, a car full of teenage boys passed me (in a no-pass area) and one of them flipped me off.

“A red light at the bottom of the hill slowed them down, and I pulled up next to them as the light changed. I smiled, waved and called out from my open car window, ‘Say hello to your mother!’ ”

The flipper’s smirk vanished.

“Loved it,” said Easley. “Works every time.”

How sweet the spell: Mike Zosel’s 3-year-old daughter, Julia, can sing “Amazing Grace.”

Well, sort of. Her version includes the line “Saved a witch like me.”

Spokane’s appeal in a nutshell: “When I was at Gonzaga (mid-’70s), half the kids said they came to Spokane because they wanted to go someplace big,” wrote James Standish. “The other half wanted to go someplace small.”

Ring-a-ding-ding: “I have pretty much trained everyone I know to always call first rather than just drop by unannounced,” wrote Nadine Presta. “Some friends feel the same while others are a bit put off by my request but for the most part abide by my wishes. Now I’m curious as to what you and your readers would say.”

Well, Nadine, I prefer that people send an e-mail notifying me of their intention to call and leave a phone message.

Then I can call back and report that I won’t be home at the time of their planned visit.

But let’s hear from some readers before we issue a ruling.

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