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Tuesday, October 15, 2019  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Sports >  Outdoors

Field reports: Mineral Ridge trail temporarily closing

HIKING – The Mineral Ridge Scenic Area off the northeast portion of Lake Coeur d’Alene, including the popular Mineral Ridge Trail, will be temporarily closed this week for hazardous tree removal, U.S. Bureau of Land Management officials say. 

The Beauty Bay-area closure is scheduled for Monday through Thursday. 

The closure applies to the parking area, picnic shelter, hiking trails and surrounding BLM lands within the recreation area.

Alternative BLM hiking and recreation areas near Coeur d’Alene include Blue Creek Bay, which is a short drive north of Mineral Ridge and offers several hiking options, a picnic area and fishing docks. 

Turkey hunting clinic at Tucannon resort

HUNTING– The 8th annual youth turkey event is set for 9 a.m.-3 p.m. on March 28 at The Last Resort and Blue Mountains KOA along the Tucannon River near Pomeroy.

The event involves food and activities to prepare kids for Washington’s youth wild turkey hunting season, April 4-5.

Volunteers from the National Wild Turkey Federation, Blue Mountain Archers, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife and U.S. Forest Service will be participating, said Jason Towery, resort owner.

Dog training day set for pointers, retrievers

TRAINING – The Spokane Bird Dog Association is inviting nonmembers to its annual Training Day on Saturday, 8 a.m.-noon, at the Espanola Training grounds west of Medical Lake.

Visitors with pointers and retrievers will be accompanied to different areas of the club-managed training grounds off Ladd Road. Club members will provide equipment and assist in field training sessions. Birds are provided for pointing dog sessions.

Cost: $20 for pointers; $5 for retrievers. Sign-up: Doug Koening, (509) 850-1839. Info: spokanebirddog.org

Bears out of dens, precautions advised

SURVIVING – Bears are on the move early this year, lured from their winter dens by unseasonably warm weather.

Bear activity has been reported in recent weeks from the Washington coast east to Yellowstone National Park.

“Black bears usually start making appearances in mid-to-late April, but warm weather can cause them to stir earlier,” said Rich Beausoleil, bear and cougar specialist for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

“Black bears are hungry when they emerge from their dens, because they lose up to half of their body weight during hibernation.”

Natural foods are scarce this early in the year, so bears often start looking for the easiest source of high-protein food.

People living in and at the edge of bear country can reduce the chance of attracting bear problems by securing garbage cans, removing backyard bird seed and keeping pet food indoors, he said.

“Situations involving bears that have learned to associate food sources with people often end badly for the bear,” Beausoleil said.

Two state laws prohibit leaving food or food waste in places where it can attract bears and other wild carnivores.

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