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Sunday, November 17, 2019  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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Sports >  Outdoors

Field reports: Grizzly researchers near Sullivan Lake

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service staffer Matt Grode fits a GPS collar on a 430-pound male grizzly bear he and Alex Welander trapped and tranquilized for ongoing research. The bear was trapped and released north of Nordman, Idaho, on June 21, 2014.
 (Alex Welander / U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service)
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service staffer Matt Grode fits a GPS collar on a 430-pound male grizzly bear he and Alex Welander trapped and tranquilized for ongoing research. The bear was trapped and released north of Nordman, Idaho, on June 21, 2014. (Alex Welander / U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service)

CRITTERS – Federal grizzly bear researchers are working near the Salmo-Priest Wilderness to trap and fit GPS collars on grizzly bears.

The researchers also are trying to get DNA samples from other bears to help determine the number of grizzlies in the Idaho-Washington Selkirk Mountains.

“No captures and no mortality to report as yet this season,” said Wayne Kasworm, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service research leader based in Libby, Montana.

“The trap crew is working around Sullivan Lake area and we have several people out setting up corrals with trail cameras to try to snag hair and get pictures of bears throughout the recovery area. 

“The trap crew will probably move into the Priest Lake basin during June.”

Last summer, the crew caught and collared one adult male grizzly bear.  

The trap team also captured 10 black bears that were ear tagged and released at the site of capture.

The study currently is monitoring five collared bears.

The research is a joint effort with British Columbia, in cooperation with the states of Washington and Idaho.  Canada researchers worked in the Selkirks north of Highway 3 last year and collared nine grizzlies.

Megafloods expert Baker brings program to SCC

GEOLOGY – A free lecture, Megafloods, the Channeled Scablands, Siberia, Mars and Beyond, will be presented by Victor Baker at 7 p.m. Tuesday at Spokane Community College Lair Auditorium.

Baker, an international authority on catastrophic Pleistocene floods, is a former Geological Society of America president and NOVA contributor.

State Parks takes over again at Lyons Ferry

PARKS – Lyons Ferry State Park on the Snake River at the mouth of the Palouse River will reopen under Washington State Parks management on Friday.

The park along Highway 261 near Starbuck was built by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in 1969 and operated as a state park until budget issues forced the state to cancel its lease in 2002.

A re-opening event is set for Friday, 11 a.m.-3 p.m.

Capital improvements at the park include a new restroom with shower facilities near the boat launch, recently installed by the Corps.

The Washington Legislature allocated $600,000 for State Parks to renovate a bathhouse, improve the parking lot, upgrade the water system, improve the boat launch lane and dock and landscape the park.

Boats need reservations

BOATING – Beginning Monday, private power boaters will be required to use a national online reservation system for jet boating on the Main Salmon Wild and Scenic River.

Formerly, the permits were obtained by a call-in system at Slate Creek Ranger Station.

The Snake and four other rivers in Idaho were moved last year to the national online site, www.recreation.gov.

For more information: Jeremy Harris at the Salmon River Ranger District at (208) 839-2211.

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