Arrow-right Camera

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Monday, January 27, 2020  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
Partly Cloudy Day 38° Partly Cloudy
News >  Spokane

Yellowstone takes measures to prevent mussels’ spread

UPDATED: Sat., June 17, 2017

FILE - In this Aug. 18, 2006 file, the crew of the fishing boat Freedom work on Yellowstone Lake using a gillnet to catch lake trout in Yellowstone National Park, Wyo. Yellowstone National Park officials are installing moveable barriers in front of boat launches in an attempt to prevent invasive species found in Montana from spreading to the park. Invasive mussel larvae have been found in Montana's Tiber Reservoir and are suspected in Canyon Ferry Reservoir. They can spread quickly, clogging pipes, displacing native species and causing other environmental problems. (DAVID GRUBBS / AP)
FILE - In this Aug. 18, 2006 file, the crew of the fishing boat Freedom work on Yellowstone Lake using a gillnet to catch lake trout in Yellowstone National Park, Wyo. Yellowstone National Park officials are installing moveable barriers in front of boat launches in an attempt to prevent invasive species found in Montana from spreading to the park. Invasive mussel larvae have been found in Montana's Tiber Reservoir and are suspected in Canyon Ferry Reservoir. They can spread quickly, clogging pipes, displacing native species and causing other environmental problems. (DAVID GRUBBS / AP)
Associated Press

JACKSON, Wyo. – Yellowstone National Park officials are installing barriers in front of boat launches in an attempt to prevent invasive mussels recently discovered in Montana from spreading to the park and into the Columbia River Basin.

Invasive mussel larvae have been found in Montana’s Tiber Reservoir and are suspected in Canyon Ferry Reservoir. They can spread quickly, clogging pipes, displacing native species and causing other environmental problems.

The moveable barriers will be installed at launches at Yellowstone and Lewis lakes to keep uninspected boats from entering the lakes when check stations and entry points aren’t staffed in the early mornings and at night, the Jackson Hole News and Guide reported. They will keep uninspected boats from entering the lakes when check stations and entry points are not staffed.

“We don’t want to be known as the park that allowed zebra mussels to enter the Columbia Basin,” Yellowstone fisheries supervisor Todd Koel said.

The Columbia River Basin is the network of waterways from Canada to Wyoming and across the Pacific Northwest that drains into the river that flows into the ocean.

Yellowstone rules require that all watercraft are inspected. Park officials use high-temperature pressure washers to make sure that vegetation, animals and debris are removed from boats before they arrive at boat launches.

Most vessels used in the park’s waters come from Montana, Wyoming and Idaho, according to boater registration data.

Subscribe to the Morning Review newsletter

Get the day’s top headlines delivered to your inbox every morning by subscribing to our newsletter.

You have been successfully subscribed!
There was a problem subscribing you to the newsletter. Double check your email and try again, or email webteam@spokesman.com