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Sports >  WSU football

Gabe Marks candid as ever at NFL combine

Washington State Cougars wide receiver Gabe Marks (9) reacts after his team was stopped at the one yard line during the second half of the 2016 Apple Cup on Friday, Nov 25, 2016, at Martin Stadium in Pullman. (Tyler Tjomsland / The Spokesman-Review)
Washington State Cougars wide receiver Gabe Marks (9) reacts after his team was stopped at the one yard line during the second half of the 2016 Apple Cup on Friday, Nov 25, 2016, at Martin Stadium in Pullman. (Tyler Tjomsland / The Spokesman-Review)

The NFL combine is a chance for NFL front office executives and national media members to figure out how far former college players can jump, how fast they can run, how many times they can bench-press 225-pounds without stopping.

It’s also a chance for them to discover something Washington State football fans have known for years: Gabe Marks answers predictable questions with entirely unpredictable answers.

Here are some highlights from his media session in Indianapolis:

On a question about his hands: “If someone says my hands suck … You suck.”

On whether Los Angeles should have two NFL teams: “I don’t know if we can handle two. We’ve got enough traffic as it is. It’s gonna be crazy.”

According to reporters present during Mark’s media session he also blasted questions about whether or not WSU’s Air Raid offense is gimmicky, and was not a fan of getting poked and prodded in his underwear during the medical examinations.

Marks won’t have to wait long to back up his words; wide receivers perform their onfield workouts on Saturday.

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