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Sports >  WSU football

Kyrin Priester returns to Washington State football, but playing next season is ‘a tall order’

In this March 31, 2016 file photo, Washington State receiver Kyrin Priester (1) runs the ball during practice at Martin Stadium in Pullman. (Tyler Tjomsland / The Spokesman-Review)
In this March 31, 2016 file photo, Washington State receiver Kyrin Priester (1) runs the ball during practice at Martin Stadium in Pullman. (Tyler Tjomsland / The Spokesman-Review)

Talented wide receiver Kyrin Priester left the Washington State football program in July of 2016. He’s back, according to Mike Leach.

While previewing the Cougars’ upcoming spring practices, which begin on Thursday, Leach said that Priester is again a member of the football team and will participate intermittently, while focusing on academics.

“He has to get his academics squared away,” Leach said. Leach added that it is possibly for Priester to play next season, but getting on solid footing in time for the 2017 season would be “a tall order.”

Priester is not yet listed on WSU’s spring football roster. He joined the Cougars in 2015 and played as a sophomore after transferring from Clemson, where he played one game in 2014.

He emerged as one of WSU’s most talented players during the team’s preseason camp, but struggled to make an impact during the season. His best game came in WSU’s win at Arizona, in which Priester finished with 64 receiving yards and a touchdown.

Priester had a redshirt year available, meaning he will be a junior in 2017. If he is not able to play then he could make his on-field return for the Cougars as a senior in 2018.

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