Arrow-right Camera
The Spokesman-Review Newspaper

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
Partly Cloudy Night 57° Partly Cloudy
Sports >  Outdoors

In brief: Silt, debris fill pools at Jerry Johnson Hot Springs

“This is like a little piece of Eden,” says Rex Conklin as he recharges his body in the warm waters of the Jerry Johnson Hot Springs in the Lochsa River drainage of Idaho. (THE SPOKESMAN-REVIEW)
“This is like a little piece of Eden,” says Rex Conklin as he recharges his body in the warm waters of the Jerry Johnson Hot Springs in the Lochsa River drainage of Idaho. (THE SPOKESMAN-REVIEW)
From staff and wire reports

HIKINGNews about this spring’s huge runoff and flooding dealt hikers a chilling blow this week with news that silt has filled pools at Jerry Johnson Hot Springs in the Lochsa River drainage of Idaho.

“The upper (largest) hot spring pool at Jerry Johnson recreation site, located along Highway 12 on the Nez Perce-Clearwater National Forests, was completely filled with silt and debris from heavy rains and high runoff,” the Forest Service reports this morning.

Some forests around the region also have reported bridge washouts or closures including one main access across the Salmon River into the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness.

But the Jerry Johnson hot springs situation sends a chill up the spine of hikers who long to trek in 1-5 miles to enjoy three enhanced natural pools on Warm Spring Creek.

“While visitors are obviously anxious to resume soaking, we ask that you allow natural hydraulics in the area to settle so forest staff can determine if this event affected the location and/or flow of the geothermal springs,” Forest officials say in a release. “After spring flows level off, the site will be assessed to determine what management is appropriate.

“Please help protect the integrity of this special place and allow natural processes to proceed by not disturbing the ground or digging holes in the debris. There is no guarantee you’ll find a “hot” spot where one previously existed, particularly while ground saturation is high. Damaging natural features can result in a fine of $250.

Hikers willing to volunteer to assist with future site maintenance can contact the Kooskia Ranger Station, (208) 926-4274.

Trout poachers nabbed at Upper Caliche Lake

FISHINGFive men have been cited for catching and killing 143 trout from Upper Caliche Lake before it opened to fishing on March 1.

“That equates to 2 percent of all the trout stocked last year for this month’s opener,” reports Northwest Sportsman magazine.

“Even if the season had been open they would have been 118 trout over their daily limit,” Washington Fish and Wildlife police reported on their Facebook Page.

The case will be handled by the Grant County Prosecutor’s office. Penalties could range up to $5,000.

The trout from the Grant County lake were seized and donated to a food bank in Moses Lake.

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper

Local journalism is essential.

Give directly to The Spokesman-Review's Northwest Passages community forums series -- which helps to offset the costs of several reporter and editor positions at the newspaper -- by using the easy options below. Gifts processed in this system are not tax deductible, but are predominately used to help meet the local financial requirements needed to receive national matching-grant funds.

Active Person

Subscribe to the sports newsletter

Get the day’s top sports headlines and breaking news delivered to your inbox by subscribing here.