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Photo: Waiting for Godot

UPDATED: Wed., May 31, 2017

Gonzaga ceramics professor Mat Rude, left, and J.J. McCracken, a Gonzaga guest artist from Washington, D.C., work Wednesday, May 31, 2017, on an immersive ceramic installation at the Washington Cracker Building in Spokane, Wash. The installation will serve as part standalone artwork and a site-responsive set piece for GU Theater’s production of Samuel Beckett’s “Waiting for Godot” directed by Charles M. Pepiton. Gonzaga’s departments of Art, and Theatre & Dance, partnered with Terrain on the project, which uses clay and recycled materials to create a structure which highlights consumption culture against a backdrop of passing freight trains. Beckett’s play depicts the futility of action and inaction and the production in juxtaposition with the art installation aims to raise questions about society’s response to climate change. Guest artist McCracken is hosting a public lecture at 5:30 p.m. Thursday, June 1, 2017, in the Jundt Art Museum auditorium, Room 110. The event is free and open to the public. (Tyler Tjomsland / The Spokesman-Review)
Gonzaga ceramics professor Mat Rude, left, and J.J. McCracken, a Gonzaga guest artist from Washington, D.C., work Wednesday, May 31, 2017, on an immersive ceramic installation at the Washington Cracker Building in Spokane, Wash. The installation will serve as part standalone artwork and a site-responsive set piece for GU Theater’s production of Samuel Beckett’s “Waiting for Godot” directed by Charles M. Pepiton. Gonzaga’s departments of Art, and Theatre & Dance, partnered with Terrain on the project, which uses clay and recycled materials to create a structure which highlights consumption culture against a backdrop of passing freight trains. Beckett’s play depicts the futility of action and inaction and the production in juxtaposition with the art installation aims to raise questions about society’s response to climate change. Guest artist McCracken is hosting a public lecture at 5:30 p.m. Thursday, June 1, 2017, in the Jundt Art Museum auditorium, Room 110. The event is free and open to the public. (Tyler Tjomsland / The Spokesman-Review)
Gonzaga ceramics professor Mat Rude, left, and J.J. McCracken, a Gonzaga guest artist from Washington, D.C., work Wednesday, May 31, 2017, on an immersive ceramic installation at the Washington Cracker Building in Spokane, Wash. The installation will serve as part standalone artwork and a site-responsive set piece for GU Theater’s production of Samuel Beckett’s “Waiting for Godot” directed by Charles M. Pepiton. Gonzaga’s departments of Art, and Theatre & Dance, partnered with Terrain on the project, which uses clay and recycled materials to create a structure which highlights consumption culture against a backdrop of passing freight trains. Beckett’s play depicts the futility of action and inaction and the production in juxtaposition with the art installation aims to raise questions about society’s response to climate change.
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