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Wednesday, January 22, 2020  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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News >  Education

Oregon State to require all students to disclose convictions

UPDATED: Fri., Feb. 16, 2018

FILE - In this March 4, 2017, file photo, Oregon State pitcher Luke Heimlich throws during an NCAA college baseball gameMarch 4, 2017, against UC Davis in Corvallis, Ore. Heimlich, who as a teenager pleaded guilty to molesting a 6-year-old girl, will not accompany the Beavers to the College World Series. The 21-year-old left-hander made the announcement in a statement released through a representative for his family. He called going to the series something that he and his teammates have worked toward all year. (Mark Ylen / AP)
FILE - In this March 4, 2017, file photo, Oregon State pitcher Luke Heimlich throws during an NCAA college baseball gameMarch 4, 2017, against UC Davis in Corvallis, Ore. Heimlich, who as a teenager pleaded guilty to molesting a 6-year-old girl, will not accompany the Beavers to the College World Series. The 21-year-old left-hander made the announcement in a statement released through a representative for his family. He called going to the series something that he and his teammates have worked toward all year. (Mark Ylen / AP)
Associated Press

CORVALLIS – Oregon State University says it will begin to require all students to self-report past felony convictions and any registered sex offender status before enrolling for fall term, but will not bar them from school activities unless they pose a safety risk.

The Corvallis Gazette-Times reported Thursday the new policy was recommended by a task force convened last year in the wake of public outcry over revelations that a university baseball team pitcher, Luke Heimlich, had an undisclosed conviction for molesting a 6-year-old family member when he was 15.

Heimlich was allowed to remain on the team after the Oregonian/Oregonlive reported the pitcher had pleaded guilty to the crime.

Heimlich said in a university statement that he completed counseling, but was removing himself to avoid being a team distraction.

AP-WF-02-16-18 0704GMT

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