Arrow-right Camera

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper The Spokesman-Review

Wednesday, October 21, 2020  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
Partly Cloudy Day 45° Partly Cloudy
News >  Nation

Autopsy: Roy Halladay had amphetamine, morphine in system

In this Dec. 9, 2013, file photo, two-time Cy Young Award winner Roy Halladay answers questions after announcing his retirement after 16 seasons in the major leagues with Toronto and Philadelphia, at the MLB winter meetings in Lake Buena Vista, Fla. An autopsy report says Halladay had evidence of amphetamine, morphine and an insomnia drug in his system when he died in a small plane crash in Florida last year. (John Raoux / Associated Press)
In this Dec. 9, 2013, file photo, two-time Cy Young Award winner Roy Halladay answers questions after announcing his retirement after 16 seasons in the major leagues with Toronto and Philadelphia, at the MLB winter meetings in Lake Buena Vista, Fla. An autopsy report says Halladay had evidence of amphetamine, morphine and an insomnia drug in his system when he died in a small plane crash in Florida last year. (John Raoux / Associated Press)
Associated Press

NEW PORT RICHEY, Fla. – An autopsy report says retired star pitcher Roy Halladay had evidence of amphetamine, morphine and an insomnia drug in his system when he died in a small plane crash in Florida last year.

The Tampa Bay Times reports that an autopsy released Friday shows the former Toronto Blue Jays and Philadelphia Phillies All-Star died from blunt force trauma with drowning as a contributing factor when he crashed his personal plane into the Gulf of Mexico near New Port Richey on Nov. 7.

The National Transportation Safety Board hasn’t identified a cause for the crash. A witness told investigators that Halladay’s ICON A5 climbed to between 300 and 500 feet before it went into a 45-degree dive and slammed into the water.

The body of the two-time Cy Young Award winner was found in the wreckage.

The Spokesman-Review Newspaper

Local journalism is essential.

Give directly to The Spokesman-Review's Northwest Passages community forums series -- which helps to offset the costs of several reporter and editor positions at the newspaper -- by using the easy options below. Gifts processed in this system are not tax deductible, but are predominately used to help meet the local financial requirements needed to receive national matching-grant funds.

Subscribe to the Coronavirus newsletter

Get the day’s latest Coronavirus news delivered to your inbox by subscribing to our newsletter.


New health insurance plans available November 1 through Washington Healthplanfinder

 (Photo courtesy WAHBE)
Sponsored

Fall means the onset of the cold and flu season.