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Five brothers help build playhouse for Zion Lutheran Church’s preschool run by their big sister

Brothers, from left, Scott Moore, Daniel Moore and David Moore (red shirt) lifts a framed wall into place with the help of nephew Ryan Moore, far right, June 14 at Zion Lutheran Church in Spokane Valley. Members of the Moore family, who all attended the church, are building a playhouse on the playground of the church’s preschool. (Jesse Tinsley / The Spokesman-Review)
Brothers, from left, Scott Moore, Daniel Moore and David Moore (red shirt) lifts a framed wall into place with the help of nephew Ryan Moore, far right, June 14 at Zion Lutheran Church in Spokane Valley. Members of the Moore family, who all attended the church, are building a playhouse on the playground of the church’s preschool. (Jesse Tinsley / The Spokesman-Review)
By Nina Culver For The Spokesman-Review

It’s not often that all five Moore brothers gather in one place, but last week they did it for a good cause – building a sturdy new playhouse for the Zoo Crew Preschool at Zion Lutheran Church in Millwood.

Their sister Pam Clark, the oldest sibling, has been a teacher at the preschool for 30 years. Zion Lutheran is also the church the family has been tied to for generations and the siblings decided to build the playhouse in honor of their parents.

“Mom and dad were at this church for 60 years,” said Scott Moore, a teacher at Freeman High School.

Their father, Ken Moore, was the choir director and taught across the street at West Valley High School for 40 years. Their mother, Carol Moore, was the church’s organist.

“It’s something Mom and Dad would have wanted,” Scott said. “This is a great way to give back in their name. It’s also nice to do something nice for Pam because she’s done so much for all of us. Plus, it’s fun to do stuff as a family.”

Dan Moore owns a Seattle construction company and took the lead as the brothers put the playhouse together. He called out measurements while his brother Dave, who retired from Central Pre-Mix, and nephew Ryan Moore used a chop saw to cut pieces of lumber to size. Cousin Rich Mize was also there to lend a hand until brother John Moore got off work as a teacher at Greenacres Middle School.

The crew planned to spend two days building the 8-foot by12-foot playhouse from the ground up. Church member Ed Lunneborg helped out by painting the siding fire engine red ahead of time.

The preschool used to have a much smaller playhouse, but it was very old and was torn out three years ago when the new playground equipment was installed. The new one has windows and will include a play sink, table and chairs.

“It’ll be an imagination station,” Clark said. “The kids turn it into all kinds of things.”

Church members created a memorial fund in their parents’ name after Carol died in 2013 and Ken died in 2015. It’s that money that is being used to build the playhouse, Clark said.

“My folks were always good with kids, and this is a good way to honor them,” she said. “We needed the playhouse, and these guys are pretty doggone good workers. They don’t listen to me, but they’re good workers.”

Like any siblings, the brothers razzed each other as they worked. They smiled and laughed as they sawed and nailed the wood.

“Just watching them work together is fun,” she said.

Brother Kevin Moore flew in from Parker, Colorado, to join the crew. Only a sister in Everett was unable to make it.

“Dad always said we had a basketball team – five players and two cheerleaders,” said Dave.

The original plans called for a smaller building. “It started as a little playhouse,” Dave said. “Then we put windows in.”

Still, they were making good progress. “It would take a couple days extra without Dan because he has some experience,” he said.

The brothers certainly weren’t cutting any corners in the construction process even if it was just a playhouse. “This is going to be a solid little playhouse,” Scott said. “It’s not going anywhere.”

Kevin, who is the youngest, stood to one side, supervising the process. “I’m the one that had to organize it,” he said. “After four or five reschedules, we finally got to this date. We don’t do many things with all five of us.”

His brothers teased him about his supervisory role and when he stepped in to hold a piece of wood as it was being cut, Scott applauded.

“I don’t know what I’m doing,” Kevin said. “I just do what I’m told.”

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