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Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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100 years ago in Spokane: Wolfhound, likely rabid, escapes movie studio and bites children, kills puppies

A large gray wolfhound belonging to movie actor William Cooper escaped from the Washington Motion Picture Corp. studios at Minnehaha Park and bit two boys, the Spokane Daily Chronicle reported on Sept. 25, 1918. The dog was suspected of having rabies. (Spokesman-Review archives)
A large gray wolfhound belonging to movie actor William Cooper escaped from the Washington Motion Picture Corp. studios at Minnehaha Park and bit two boys, the Spokane Daily Chronicle reported on Sept. 25, 1918. The dog was suspected of having rabies. (Spokesman-Review archives)

A large gray wolfhound belonging to movie actor William Cooper escaped from the Washington Motion Picture Corp. studios at Minnehaha Park.

The actor put a “lost dog” ad in the paper, but in the meantime, the dog spread destruction. It reportedly made its way to Manito Park where it killed two Alaskan wolf puppies. Then it bit two boys who attempted to play with it near their homes.

The dog was reported to the Humane Society, and the dogcatcher nabbed it and took it to the society’s barns, where it exhibited rabies-like symptoms. It died at the barns.

The boys suffered severe gashes on their arms and were both treated for rabies. They were said to be “up and about today.”

From the bootlegging beat: “Stub” Hooker and Spokane police officer James Donovan both pleaded not guilty during preliminary hearings. They were accused of playing a trick on bootlegger J.L. “Dago” Smith and stealing eight cases of whisky and $20 in cash intended as a bribe.

Meanwhile, Smith was also arrested on bootlegging charges.

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