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Sunday, October 20, 2019  Spokane, Washington  Est. May 19, 1883
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News >  Spokane

100 years ago in Spokane: Compromise raises streetcar fare to 6 cents; Minnehaha movie studio in trouble

UPDATED: Tue., April 2, 2019, 6:36 a.m.

The state Public Service Commission approved a controversial 1 cent streetcar fare increase to 6 cents, for at least 90 days, the Spokane Daily Chronicle reported on April 2, 1919. This was a compromise, since Spokane’s two private streetcar companies had asked for an increase to 7 cents. (Spokesman-Review archives)
The state Public Service Commission approved a controversial 1 cent streetcar fare increase to 6 cents, for at least 90 days, the Spokane Daily Chronicle reported on April 2, 1919. This was a compromise, since Spokane’s two private streetcar companies had asked for an increase to 7 cents. (Spokesman-Review archives)

The state Public Service Commission approved a controversial 1 cent streetcar fare increase to 6 cents for at least 90 days.

This was a compromise, since Spokane’s two private streetcar companies had asked for an increase to 7 cents. The Spokane City Council had opposed any fare increase.

This was the newest development in an ongoing Spokane streetcar crisis. The 90-day fare increase was intended to give the streetcar companies financial relief until they could be merged under a recent consolidation agreement.

The Public Service Commission issued a statement in which it said it “views the situation in Spokane as serious” and did not believe that “the representatives of the people are lacking in good faith in trying to solve some of these difficulties.”

It said the City Council had “inherited some mistakes of the past.”

The Spokane Daily Chronicle’s editorial page expressed the hope that the nickel fare would return after 90 days.

From the film beat: The Washington Motion Picture Corporation in Spokane was in receivership after making only one disappointing feature film. However, the man appointed as receiver, F.K. McBroom, had not given up hope of resurrecting Spokane’s fledgling film industry.

He said other film producers had made offers to lease the Minnehaha Park studio. There was a chance that someone might make another movie at the studio in the summer.

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